Repaint or TexCote Stucco


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Old 03-16-07, 12:24 AM
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Question Repaint or TexCote Stucco

Hi -
We live in a house thats over 20 years old and the time has come to take care of the outside. The houses paint has become very dull and dirty and it needs to be addressed. The cracks are minimal and mostly around the windows from the earthquake. I have had a few contractors come in for estimates and one suggested that they tear down the stucco and re do it, another suggested that anything other than just repainting it would be bad and a few suggested a product called texcote.

The prices for all the choices are similar with the exception of the person who wants to tear it all and do it over. My question whats the advantages that justify the cost of the texcote over just repainting it ? Is it better ?

Thanks
pete
 
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Old 03-16-07, 04:40 AM
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Coatings are several times thicker than paint. Texcote makes many products. Cracks would have to be repaired, the recommended Texcote primer and coating used. Surface prep is extremely important. Learn more about Texcote products, specifications, warranties, etc. at www.texcote.com Always read the fine print on warranties. If in doubt, contact the manufacturer.

Moisture penetration in stucco can jeopardize the integrity of your home. Simply painting will not solve your problems.
 
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Old 03-16-07, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole View Post
Moisture penetration in stucco can jeopardize the integrity of your home. Simply painting will not solve your problems.
Not exactly true. Depending on the condition of the stucco, paint can do a lot to preserve it. First the stucco should be clean, then any needed repairs made. If there is any problem with chalk, a masonary binder should be sprayed on. Minor chalk can be addressed by adding emulsa bond to the primer. Using an elastromeric paint for the top coat usually gives the best protection.

I used to paint stucco all the time when I lived in fla. Even with fla's intense sun which is hard on paint, it wasn't uncommon for a stucco paint job [done correctly] to last over 10 yrs. I've never used texcote so I can't comment about it.
 
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Old 03-17-07, 08:50 PM
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I am looking for someone who has had experience with both repainting and texcote or rather second hand experience regarding them and can simply state the differences.

From what i have read repainting old stucco is bad because it can cause mold problems. Even though i have read that with proper prep repaint can be successful it can be expected that a repaint will have to be done within a few years.

I am a bit confused on the pros and cons of each.

pete
 
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Old 03-18-07, 05:07 AM
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Originally Posted by jeepsrock View Post
From what i have read repainting old stucco is bad because it can cause mold problems.
Where did you come by this info?

When I lived in fla I painted more stucco exteriors than any other type. It is true that a cheap paint will only last a few years but quality coatings can protect stucco for 10 yrs or so. It is imperitive to clean the stucco and remove any mildew or mold prior to painting.
 
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Old 04-05-10, 03:55 PM
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repainting stucco vancouver bc

Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Not exactly true. Depending on the condition of the stucco, paint can do a lot to preserve it. First the stucco should be clean, then any needed repairs made. If there is any problem with chalk, a masonary binder should be sprayed on. Minor chalk can be addressed by adding emulsa bond to the primer. Using an elastromeric paint for the top coat usually gives the best protection.

I used to paint stucco all the time when I lived in fla. Even with fla's intense sun which is hard on paint, it wasn't uncommon for a stucco paint job [done correctly] to last over 10 yrs. I've never used texcote so I can't comment about it.
I live in vancouver bc and house is 24 years old with acrylic stucco which is still in pretty good shape. Should I use a mild bleach solution (or ?)to kill any mildew (although none is visible). Is there not antimildew agent in exterior paint and what is best method of applying? don't want to spray so type of roller and type of paint - such as elastic acrylic etc. Can one justify using very expensive Benjamin Moore paint? I want good quality paint that will not crack but I have my $ limits. Any advice appreciated. (Sorry if I missed anylinks that might have explained this but could not find.) Thanks.
 
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Old 04-06-10, 04:14 AM
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It's always best to clean an exterior before repainting. It may allow the new paint to bond better - which is always a good thing Make sure any/all cleaning agents are rinsed well!

Most paints come with some level of mildewcide already in the forumla. You can also buy extra mildewcide which the paint store can mix in the paint for you... or you can buy it separately and add yourself. I normally only add extra mildewcide if I know mold/mildew is a problem.

BM has the great coatings but they also have some bargain basement lines that aren't worth using. As long as you use their mid line or better - you'll have good results. The same can be said about most paint companies. Price is usually an indicator of quality.

Quality paints shouldn't crack although stucco sometimes does. An elastromeric paint is somewhat flexible and will often hide and even prevent cracks from showing. Elastromeric paints don't go as far as regular paint so you'd have to plan on buying more paint. Elastromeric paint usually lasts a long time just like a quality house paint. Masonary paints are usually a lower grade and don't last as long as house paint.

I usually use a 1"-1.5" nap roller cover depending on the texture of the stucco. Even when you spray, it's best to back roll - pushes the paint into the substrate.

Most of my painting experience is in the S.E. USA and I've never painted as far north as you are. Your local paint store should be knowledgeable about painting in your locale.

hope this helps,
mark
 
 

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