Brick Home Addition - what about the joint ?


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Old 05-03-07, 08:31 AM
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Brick Home Addition - what about the joint ?

We're planning on replacing our old porch with a new addition to house our parents in lieu of them going to a nursing home. The plans are to extend the back of our house which is currently brick (painted).
I want both sides of the addition to be in brick, with the back as siding. I want the house to be "seen" from the road as a large, contiguous building, not broken-up.
My question is this:
What techniques are used to insure the new bricks will be set so as NOT to have a single cement joint where the new and old sections meet ?
Will some of the old bricks need to be broken out so that the new bricks can be fit in a regular pattern ?
How is this done ?
I don't want a single verticle seam to be showing...that would look dumb.
 
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Old 05-03-07, 10:04 AM
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It may look dumb, but it the correct and best way to do it. You can tooth it in, but the chances of problems down the road will be much greater.
 
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Old 05-03-07, 10:20 AM
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Brick Home Addition - what about the joint ?

You should also make sure the two structures (existing and new) have the foundations well tied together so there is no possiblity of differential movement.

If you do not plan for a neat, clean and narrow caulked joint, you will have an irrregular cracks that makes eveything look like shoddy construction.

The joint doesn not have to stand out if you do it right. You wll see it, but no one else will.

If you are going to paint the entire house to make sure everything matches, make sure the brick you use have a similar texture as the old after the painting. If the new brick have a coarser texture, the the paint will appear darker.

Dick
 
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Old 05-03-07, 05:17 PM
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Thanks, but I don't understand "the problems down the road" regarding the "toothing".
The "toothing" will be done at the bricked corner (key word) of the house.....probably the strongest spot structurally.
In other words, we're going to keep the existing back which is brick and just stud out the existing brick wall which will become the interior.
 
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Old 05-03-07, 05:31 PM
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You should also make sure the two structures (existing and new) have the foundations well tied together so there is no possiblity of differential movement.
if you do not plan for a neat, clean and narrow caulked joint, you will have an irrregular cracks that makes eveything look like shoddy construction.
The joint doesn not have to stand out if you do it right. You wll see it, but no one else will.
If you are going to paint the entire house to make sure everything matches, make sure the brick you use have a similar texture as the old after the painting. If the new brick have a coarser texture, the the paint will appear darker.
Dick
We will be pouring a new foundation, so that should not be a problem.
"You will see it, but no one else will." Dick - I'm not sure about this to tell you the truth. There will be a single, verticle "seam" that will just scream "I'm an addition" ! I was trying to avoid that.
Good point on the brick texture...as I was "bit" by that one installing a new window that required new brickwork...the newer bricks were quite porous. I was able to overcome that problem by painting them with two coats of the Home Depot's "Aquacrylic" primer which I consider to be "the best". It's heavy-bodied and hardens like no other paint....it's "pure" acrylic...unlike those cheap paints that are full of cheap PVA's. That paint "filled-in" the pores beautifully.
I forsee no problems in the color matching.....it's pure "white"...but not quite "ceiling white" which is the purest.
Yes, we'll repaint the entire "facing" side just to make it perfect.
 
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Old 05-03-07, 07:58 PM
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It is your house. Make sure the new foundation is doweled into the old, break back the brick on the corner, and carry on. See you in a few years to answer your question on how to cheaply repair a crack in a painted brick wall.
 
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Old 05-04-07, 05:05 AM
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I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that I will guarantee a very unslightly crack if you try to tooth in the new brick to the old or do a vertical joint with mortar. If you tooth it in, the crack will go right through brick; if its a single vertical mortar joint, the joint will crack and separate.

Bite the bullet and do it right with a caulk joint. It really won't look that bad.

And if you really want to learn about proper masonry construction, here is a link to the Brick Institute http://www.bia.org/html/frmset_thnt.htm
 
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Old 05-05-07, 08:04 AM
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Thanks much ... to all who responded

Thanks guys....it appears I was wrong about the toothing....I would just be asking for trouble down-the-road. The caulking looks to be the best idea....and we'll put in butterfly bushes to hide the lower part.
 
 

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