Mason's Rule


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Old 05-17-07, 12:03 PM
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Question Mason's Rule

I have been searching all over the Internet for a good tutorial about how to use a mason's rule with the course numbers. I kind of understand the concept but I have had a couple people give me information that was confusing.

Here is my situation. I'm going to put a brick veneer on my house using king size brick from Trinity Brick. They measure 2 5/8" x 2 5/8" x 9 5/8" according to there specs. I was instructed that you always want to lay your brick out from the top to the bottom so that if you have any cuts or alterations to the courses it is done on the ground so it isn't noticed. Which makes sense?

So taking into account a soldier course at the top, which should be roughly 10” + ½” for a slight gap at the top for fit and being able to angle the brick in. At that point you would make a mark on the story pole and make your marks going to the ground based on the 0 mark since that comes out to 2 5/8” + 3/8” mortar joint. And you lay the courses out like that.

Is this the right method? I just haven’t seen many how-to's online for this portion of doing a brick veneer. This makes me want to put one together as I install this brick veneer on my house. I’m guessing that most DIYer’s don’t ever attempt a brick veneer on an existing house…

Any insight the old pro’s can give would be greatly appreciated!

TIA

Nate
 
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Old 05-17-07, 01:15 PM
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In your situation with a soldier course, it makes more sense to cut the soldier. I'll come back later with rule info.
 
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Old 05-17-07, 01:31 PM
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OK, I have a break.

There are 2 ways to use the brick rule.

First, if you know what size mortar joint you are going to use, you just add the brick size and mortar joint size on the scale side, put your fingernail on the edge and turn over the rule to the spacing side. Where ever your finger falls is the letter to use.

If you want to make the brick fit without a cut, measure up the wall using the spacing side and use the letter closest to the top. In your case, you would mark off the soldier, then measure to that mark. Be sure and leave room at the top to lay in the soldier, and cut it if needed (that is, if there is no letter within a 1/4 of the space).
 
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Old 05-17-07, 05:52 PM
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"I was instructed that you always want to lay your brick out from the top to the bottom so that if you have any cuts or alterations to the courses it is done on the ground so it isn't noticed."

You were instructed to do the right thing for the wrong reason. The first course of brick has to be level, and the slab seldom is. However, you can generally make up a 1/2 to 3/4" with mud alone. Anything greater will require cutting wedged brick.

The reason for a soldier course at the top of the wall is to allow for an easy yet pleasing way to fill in the gap on a wall that does not meet coursing measurements.
 
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Old 05-19-07, 05:46 PM
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Thanks for the information!

My brick ledge should be pretty level. I used a site level and drove rebar in the ground at the same height around the house and I'm going to pour the concrete using a line pump to the top of the rebar. I drove them about every 4' or so. I also used a hammer drill and put 1/2" rebar pins from the old foundation to the brick ledge that will be poured so they are tied together.

I'm hoping the brickledge is pretty level.

But that brings me to another question. There are a couple reasons I'm bricking my house. #1 I want low maintenance, I hate painting so the less I have to paint the better. #2 - Our old portion of the house isn't the straightest in the world and I want to cover it up with a straigh brick veneer so it is pleasing the the eye.
Everything I have read says use a 1" air space. Do you have to make it 1"? Can it be 2" Or are there some reasons why you must stick to 1"?

TIA,

Nate
 
  #6  
Old 05-19-07, 07:47 PM
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2" is better than 1". After you have your brick up about 5 courses (being very careful to clean up your mortar droppings inside the wall), fill it with pea gravel 4-5" deep, and do not forget your weeps on 18" centers.
 
 

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