Cultured stone piller

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-19-07, 01:20 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Cultured stone piller

I have purchased some cultured stone to build a 2' x 2' x 3' drystack piller on the cement floor on my front porch. (To hold a beautiful tall planter and plant).
The instructions only explain how to attach it to an exsisting structure such as siding or a piller. And they explain how to make a wall in which they have you fill in the center with loose rock) I've searched for several hours on the internet and find only the same instructions. I want to do the work myself but I want to do it in a place where there is not any exsisting structure. But I want to also do it right. Can anyone help me?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-19-07, 04:02 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
First, you need a substructure, either rough framed or other. Then you will attached cement backerboard to the substructure with exterior type screws (deck screw work fine). Once you have gotten this far, you will need to purchase some Type N mortar and Masonary sand.

Planning is the key, as depending on the type of cultured stone you purchased, it comes in either random widths or standard widths. Build your substructure to work with the stone you purchased.

Mix the mortar and sand with water (2 1/4 parts mortar to 2 parts sand) and back butter your stone and attach to the substructure. Build from the bottom up and use tile spacers (little rubber crosses) to help keep the build in line and level.

Cultured stone does not have consistent color all the way through it, so any cuts you need to make need to be blended or hidden vs the stone next to it. Always finish a course with a factory edge. Criss/Cross the ends with each row so they interlock like a brick wall does.

You need to work the math well on this job prior to beginning. It sometimes is helpfull to lay the stones out on the floor first. Use masking tape to draw the shape of your wall on the floor and dry fit the stone before beginning. This will help you adjust various height stones so that your wall comes out being the correct height and not too high or low. Once your are happy with the layout on the floor, installation should be realtively quick.

Wipe off any excess mortar as you go. Do not use water, simply brush any excess away. This is a challenge for a novice, but it can be done. The results will be dramatic and provide much satisfaction.

Best wishes on your project.
 
  #3  
Old 07-19-07, 06:01 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,405
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Which exact stone is it?
 
  #4  
Old 07-19-07, 09:21 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Reply to cziczi

Thank you so much for your great instructions. I am very excited to try the project now that it will be done right and last well! I love this site! I didn't know about it yesterday!!
 
  #5  
Old 07-19-07, 09:30 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Reply to Tscarborough

The stone is by Owens Corning Cultured Stone from the Designer Series in the Mist Drystack Ledgestone color (CSV-2008) A pretty color that I hope will go well with our light gray house paint with medium gray trim. Can't wait to try the process.
 
  #6  
Old 07-19-07, 09:41 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,405
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
CS Drystack Ledgestone is somewhat modular on the corners. You need to make the column on a size that breaks on 4" (minimum 12"x12"), like 12"x12" or 16"x16", the larger the better. Mist is a gray base color, so the cuts will not be too obvious, though you can minimize them by buying about 15% more than you need and doing the corners first and culling for size on the field. When you do have cuts, face them away from the primary viewing angle of the pillar.

If you use Hardi backer, it is quicker to use a latex modified thinset to set the stones, and start from the bottom. Drystack Ledgestone is one of the thicker styles, so it is also advisable to have some shims to hold the stone in place as you go. I use 1/8" cheapo floor tile broken into small pieces for this.
 
  #7  
Old 07-20-07, 05:14 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
Modified Thinset is stickier than Type N mortar and is messy to work with if you are not careful. Tscarborough - what procedures do you use to get excess thinset off the stone? I picture a novice with the stuff everywhere (hands, clothes, all over the stone) and a nightmare trying to keep the job clean. Type N doesn't really stick until it drys, so you can brush it away during the build. Its also what the manufacturer recommends.

Just trying to recommend procedures that are more user friendly for a 1st time DIYer.
 
  #8  
Old 07-20-07, 06:05 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,405
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I don't get any on the stone. Just kidding. I remove it the exact same way as I do mortar:

I let it dry to crumbly stage (30-40 minutes, hour or 2 for mortar), then brush it off with a stiff bristle plastic brush.


Never try to get it off when it is wet, but most importantly, take your time and be clean.
 
  #9  
Old 07-20-07, 08:44 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks much for all the advise!
 
  #10  
Old 07-20-07, 08:57 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,405
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Czizzi, I always recommend thinset over backboard, mortar over lath/scratchcoat. It can be messier, but it is a lot less frustrating to make stick, which is the number one complaint I hear from DIY'ers doing an adheered veneer for the first time.

The secret to either is to make the mix drier than you would think it needs to be. If it is wet, it takes too long for the backup material to suck enough moisture out of the mud to hold the stone in place. The other cautionary note is to mix small batches of thinset at time, and make sure it is very well mixed.
 
  #11  
Old 07-20-07, 02:58 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This is so great to receive this instruction. The guy I had called to come do the work for me wanted over $800 to do the project. (remember a 2' x 2' x 3' project with stone I'd already purchased!) maybe on a good day thats a good buy I don't know, but for me it wasn't worth it to spend that much to have it done.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: