Trench footing question


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Old 08-16-07, 02:23 PM
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Trench footing question

I dug a trench for a 6" thick footing (for a 24' wall that will be 2 courses of 8" CMU). I strung a masons line as a guide and it's 6" deep on one end and 12" deep on the other end to account for a slight slope.

1) How do I make sure the top of the footing will be level since there are no forms?

2) Does it need to be reinforced? DIY sites don't mention it.

3) Also, I will be hand mixing quikrete in a wheelbarrow. Is it possible to pour this in phases due to time constraints? Thanks.

Mark
 
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Old 08-16-07, 02:50 PM
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Trench footing question

The top of your footing should be level. Use forms to determine the top of the footing.

I assume you dug it 12" deep because of the slope of the ground. With a 6" thick footing, one end of your footing will have the top at ground level - Is that what you want and what your code permits?

The only way to do it neatly is with forms for the top portion. - This will allow you to set the elevation.

You can also set some points from grade stakes near the footing. Without forms, but you will have less control, use extra concrete and have a bad appearanece.

If you are going to possibly pour the footing in segments, you should use 2 - #5 rebars in the footing. This is normally not for strength, but for continuity, practicality and common sense.

If you pour in sections, use 2x6s (or 1x6s - whatever you use for the forms) to form a joint to end each section. Make cut-outs in the 2x6 (1x6) to slip around the rebar. You should not have uncontrolled cold joints.

You did not mention what the purpose of the wall was. You should check to make sure you are not out of code compliance to eliminate penalties and tear-out costs. The code is there to protect you and set a minimum standard even if you do not need a permit.
 
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Old 08-16-07, 05:59 PM
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Had you used segmental retaining wall units, you could be showing us pictures of the wall instead of asking how to level expensive concrete.
 
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Old 08-17-07, 02:39 PM
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CM, The purpose of this wall is to replace an existing 6' high redwood board fence that was built on grade between two CMU/stucco wing walls. I removed the fence, metal posts (which were set misaligned) and starting from scratch. Finish height will be the same as original.

My intent is to build the fence atop the tile wall so that pets can't find a way out. I already cemented my posts in 24" below minimum finish grade in the center of the trench. (18" plus depth of trench, so that it will be 24" below the top of the footing after it's poured). The posts will be in the center of the tiles and those cells fully grouted.

I'm still not clear of how you would be build a form for the top portion as you noted. Is it built in the trench but 6" above the bottom... and I pour up to it? Someone suggested to me that I could lay my first course as I pour the footing going (and stopping) at my own pace... he also recommended the reinforcement for tie-in purposes. Thoughts on this?

Thanks for the input CM.

Tscarborough... yeah yeah yeah I know. I would if I could. ;P
 
 

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