How to fix a small portion of garage floor


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Old 09-28-07, 02:48 PM
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How to fix a small portion of garage floor

I have an attached one car garage. My house was built 45 years ago and the concrete floor is all cracked. Under the garage door, the floor cracked into 3 pieces and the center piece is higher than the two side pieces. This makes it impossible for my garage door to seal out insects and critters.

I was thinking of taking out the first foot or so of the cracked concrete and pouring some new concrete in, smooth and level, so that my garage door makes a nice seal.

How deep would I have to go? I was going to use my circular saw with a masonry blade and chisel it out with a cold chisel. It would only be 9 sq. ft.

I would like the new concrete to be level with the highest point of the old garage floor (in the middle), so that means that the new concrete would be higher than the floor on the two sides where the slab has sunk. How do I keep concrete from pouring into the garage there?

Between the garage floor and the driveway, there is a black board thing. Could I use this type of material along the back to keep the concrete from pouring into the rest of the garage at the low spots?

Full disclosure: We plan to finish the garage as we now use the new 3 car garage on another part of our property for the cars and workshop. But since we're on a floodplain, we can't convert this attached garage to "Living Space." But I still want to keep the critters out.

Any advise is greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 10-02-07, 05:53 PM
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I'm bumping this, hoping to get some sort of reply.

Thanks.
 
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Old 10-04-07, 03:25 AM
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It's hard to picture what you're talking about. From the description it sounds like the garage apron (outside the door) that has settled, but you're saying it's the garage floor. Confusing.
I will say one thing though: Concrete that flows is far too wet. When you place concrete, it pretty much stays where you put it, so it wouldn't "pour back into the garage" at the higher points. If it flows like that, you've mixed it way too wet and created an inferior mix. The only thing that wet would be a self-levelling overlay.

Pecos
 
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Old 10-04-07, 08:02 AM
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Ahh, I see. I wasn't clear enough. Sorry about that.

The exterior walls of the first floor of my house has poured concrete walls that was poured into a form that left both sides resembling bricks, but it's about 6 inches of solid concrete. This includes the three exterior walls of my garage.

Because of that, the garage floor was poured after the walls and the foundation. I've heard some people call this a "floating floor" but I'm not sure if that is the proper terminology.

At the front, there is an opening in the wall for the garage door. The walls on each side of the opening are concrete, like the rest of the walls in my house.

When the builders poured the garage floor, they brought it flush to the exterior of those walls on either side of the garage door opening. When closed, the garage door is behind the walls, so there is an bit of floor exposed to the outside, from the front of the door to the exterior face of the walls.

Is that called an apron?

Anyway, the entire floor is cracked. Two of these cracks start about four feet inside the garage and go all the way out to the apron, essentially leaving the apron in three pieces. The two sides pieces of the apron nearest the walls have sunk, so the bottom of the garage door stops at the higher center piece, leaving gaps between the apron and the bottom of the door where mice and such can get in. It is like a hill with the peak in the middle and valleys to each side. This hill continues back into the garage.

I want to cutout the apron flush with the interior face of the walls and pour a new, level apron.

Now you're probably thinking that the garage door will still be behind that new apron. And you're correct.

I plan on replacing the garage door with carriage doors that will be flush with the exterior of the walls and over the new apron. I just need it to be level so the new carriage doors make a nice tight seal along the bottom.

Is that clearer?

My concern is that when I cut out the apron, the floor in the garage will still be uneven. If I use a leveled 2x4 as a form for the concrete, there will be substantial gaps on each side. How do I keep the concrete from flowing under the 2x4 and into the garage?

Pecos, you're saying that the concrete shouldn't flow under the 2x4 where it is above the current floor?

One idea I had was to get some of those expansion joints from the home depot and tack them to the 2x4 that I will use as a form with some brads so that they rise just a bit above the highpoint of the floor and extend down into where the new concrete will be poured. Once the new concrete has cured, I just pull the 2x4 up, (the brads should just pull through the expansion joint) and leave the expansion joint there.

Do I need to add rebar? It won't be supporting any extra weight. But I don't want it to crack in the future.
 
 

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