CMU Garden Wall


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Old 10-23-07, 08:49 AM
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CMU Garden Wall

Hello.

I'm planning to build a small 15 foot long by 3 foot high nearly-semicircle wall using 8" CMU blocks. I consider myself a somewhat competent DIY'er but I'm not sure what the best way is to build a curved wall out of cement blocks. Any ideas about how to go about doing this. i.e., do I need to cut the blocks individually?

Thanks-
 
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Old 10-23-07, 10:31 AM
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The radius of the wall and the finish will dictate which block you use and how you lay it out. Have you decided those 2 questions?
 
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Old 10-23-07, 10:47 AM
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CMU Garden Wall

Do not use normal 8" CMUs for a curved garden wall - too costly and time-consumimg in the end and not long-lasting as a retainng wall unless mortared and reinforced. The time and cost of cutting for curved wall is out of sight.

Use segmental retaining wall units that do not require a footing or mortar. Check out the sites for Allan Block, Anchor Wall Systems, Keystone or Versalok. All are available throughout the U.S. and in most countries.

They also have seberal appearances/textures and can be colored.

Dick
 
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Old 10-23-07, 11:19 AM
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CMU Garden Wall

Thanks for the responses.

However, I think I mis-spoke. It's hard to envision, but basically it's a semi-circle along the edge of my acid-stain patio. The line that forms the back of the semi-circle would be the foundation wall of my house. So, basically, the semi circle runs out from the foundation wall on one side, and arcs around back to the foundation wall in a nearly semi-circle shape. It's going to be used for a small pond. My plan is to build a block wall, waterproof the inside of the new wall, waterproof the existing foundation wall, bring in fill dirt to form the shape of the bottom of my small pond, and put down a pond liner. If I had to guess, I'd say it's roughly 10 feet from left to right, and 6 feet from front to back at the widest point. It's not a perfectly formed semi-circle. I'm going to veneer the 'outside' surface of the semi-circle with Cultured Stone Bucks County Southern Ledgestone. The 'inside' surface of the wall will be unfinished as it will be hidden by the pond. The cap of the wall will be mortared pieces of irregular plum bluestone.
 
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Old 10-23-07, 05:55 PM
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Three foot of head will likely tumble a simple laid up block wall.
 
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Old 10-24-07, 07:11 AM
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You think a mortared, reinforced with rebar block wall three feet high won't hold?
 
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Old 10-24-07, 10:45 AM
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CMU Garden Wall

You can make it hold if you use both horizontal and vertical rebar. That is only a structural problem. A wide footing with dowels ("L" shaped rebars) projecting where your vertical steel will be. You will also need horizontal rebars because of the curved shape. Since it is a DIY project, with no real quality control, I would use 12" wide block.

If you want it completely watertight, you have to build it with that in mind. Reinforce it with more closely spaced rebar. You will also have to have sealed, waterproof joints at the footing/slab and where the wall meets the existing. If you plan on the liner being your only water barrier, the waterproofing is not as critical.

Dick
 
 

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