Re-paving home parking lot


  #1  
Old 12-02-07, 07:00 PM
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Re-paving home parking lot

My parents have a parking lot outside their semi-rural home that is probably over 20-some years old. It has cracked and the pavement is coming up in pieces, I think mostly due to run-off coming down the road into the lot and then continuing down and also probably due to low winter temperatures. It makes it really hard for them to shovel snow / ice, is just going to get worse, and is starting to just look bad. I was hoping to fix that for them. The parking lot is about 35 feet long and 20 feet wide.

Is it generally better to get professionals to do this, or is this a valid DIY project? I don't have any of the equipment I think would be needed (large truck, a small mixer, ... probably jackhammer?) - but I'm guessing I could rent it all by the day if I wanted to. Would this be fairly simple, or should I just bite the bullet and call around for some estimates?

Has anyone tried doing something like this themselves without prior experience?

Or... does anyone have a good educated guess on what I might be expecting to pay for any of this (either for materials if DIY, or to professionals)?

Thanks!!
 
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Old 12-03-07, 04:26 AM
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This amount of concrete demo and put-back is definitely not a DIY project if you have no experience. First, it would take you a long time to break out 700 square feet of concrete with a jackhammer. When you finally get it broken up, what do you do with it? You'll need either a couple of dumpsters or a dump truck, and a place to get rid of it. The rental time to do it this way would not be cheap (over $150/day for jackhammer, bits, hose and air compressor) plus dumpsters or dump truck.
Then, trying to mix over 8.5 cubic yards of concrete with a little mixer would be not only incredibly time-consuming, but you'd get inferior concrete and have to do the job in many small pours due to the time factor. Unless you bought air-entraining admixtures to mix in with your batches, the concrete would not have the necessary air content to withstand freeze/thaw cylces. Not to mention the grading, forming, backfilling, compacting, finishing, etc. All of this takes the necessary tools and experience to get an acceptable result. Finally, you would NOT want to start this project at the beginning of the winter. You'd never get it done before sometime next spring, and the folks would be without a driveway all winter.
On the other hand, if you hire it out it could be done in about 3 days with no fuss. Figuring it at $6 per square foot ($2 for tearout and removal, $4 for replacement) it would cost in the neighborhood of $4,200. You'd get a better product, better concrete, professional finish, and depending on where you live it could be completed before the really bad weather hits. Good luck.

Pecos
 
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Old 12-03-07, 06:39 AM
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I agree you should hire this done, but I'm skeptical of Pecos' estimate, I think it would probably cost another thousand or two.
 
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Old 12-03-07, 06:55 AM
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Pricing all depends on the market where you are. As an Indianapolis area concrete contractor myself, the $4,200 is about what I would charge. The price would not include any type of winter weather protection, which would be extra.

Pecos
 
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Old 12-03-07, 09:03 AM
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are we talking about asphalt or concrete. either way i would get estimates from a pro. remember that there are many hit and run guys in the asphalt business when it comes to small jobs. they all have the best sealer ever invented. i would call a large paving operation and ask if they do small jobs when they are slow or if they could recommend a few guys who do quality work. they should know them as the small guys will most likely be purchasing their hot-mix from them.
 
 

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