Stem Wall Repair Material to Stop Water Infiltration


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Old 12-30-07, 06:44 PM
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Question Stem Wall Repair Material to Stop Water Infiltration

What is the best material to fill vertical cavities in a stem wall footing that were left by forming steaks used to pour the stem wall 25 years ago? I have 5 such openings along a 20 foot section of stem wall that were the conduit for an enormous amount of water that entered from an adjoining townhouse recently. My crawl space is a few inches lower than the adjoining crawl space and the water from the flooded adjacent crawl space just fountained up into our crawl space. These cavities measure 1” x 4” and are anywhere from 12” to 18” deep. I was going to use a product like QUIKRETE - Hydraulic Water-Stop Cement since it is not supposed to shrink and will stop water, but I was wondering if there were any newer products that would do a better job.





Also, in addition to another water infiltration source, I suspect the aforementioned source has been flooding our dirt crawl space for several seasons and may have something to do with the large crack in the adjoining stem wall. What would be a good product to fill this vertical crack?



Thanks for taking the time to read my post and consider my questions

Howard
 
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Old 01-01-08, 05:27 AM
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if this were my problem,,,

might well choose your method w/the following caveat,,, i'd have the cracks inject'd w/hydrophyllic polyurethane after 60-90 days,,, would also use reg conc to reduce exp + install a water management system ( sump & pump ).

' forming steaks ' might be better express'd as form pins or ' stakes ', tho,,, we eat steaks :-)
 
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Old 01-01-08, 12:37 PM
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OK, sounds like you think using hydraulic cement to fill the stake cavities is one solution. Regarding the vertical crack, what did you mean by “i'd have the cracks inject'd w/hydrophyllic polyurethane after 60-90 days”? 60-90 days after what?

Also, you said “would also use reg conc to reduce exp”. Are you saying I should use regular concrete instead of hydraulic concrete to reduce expense?

BTW, I had a good laugh after you pointed out my error. I think I must have beef on the mind. My wife is making her killer Yankee Pot Roast for dinner tonight and I have been salivating thinking about it for days.
 
 

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