driveway anchored to house slab


  #1  
Old 02-22-08, 01:15 PM
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driveway anchored to house slab

I'm having a driveway replaced and I've been told by various contractors two different ways, so I'm not sure which way to go. The existing driveway looks like it was poured with the house slab, though no piers under it. It is 40+years and has several breaks, however, the part closest to the house foundation is still attached and sloping away from the house.

Several contractors have recommended not to attach the new driveway to the house foundation. Pour it and as the ground settles, it will settle evenly instead of trying to hold on to the foundation and possibly causing structural damage. A couple of other contractors recommend drilling into the house slab and attaching it because, not if, but when it does begin to crack, the attached side will not slope toward the house. The driveway will be 11x11x4 (should it be 6"d?)

Also, if to be attached to the house, how far out from the foundation would any rods go into the new slab and what size?

I'm in Southern Louisiana and below sea level, so ground is constantly settling.

Thanks for any guidance you can provide.

Maria
 

Last edited by woods; 02-23-08 at 07:40 AM. Reason: misspelling of a word
  #2  
Old 02-22-08, 05:02 PM
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If it were me and there were no cracks in the first 3 or 4 foot of apron attached to the house, I would have them saw cut a joint and leave that section. If that is not possible, I would not attach it. You should seriously consider concrete pavers, though. They are a bit more expensive than poured concrete in S. Louisiana, but all cracking is pre-engineered. At worst your driveway may get wavy down the road, but the integrity of the pavement will be intact.
 
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Old 02-24-08, 09:25 PM
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if it were mine,,,

i'd do as scar suggests but cut closer to the house by 1 or 2',,, then i'd have the conc d/w replac'd w/conc properly jointed, it won't crk & will be less expensive, too,,, attractiveness is another issue only you can decide, tho.

'pre-engineered cracking' - i like that term, scar,,, any licensing fees if i use it ? ? ?
 
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Old 03-06-08, 07:38 AM
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Thank you both for your imput. I will get an engineer to look at it. Pavers will likely not stay put for long because of the slope and wash off, but they would look very nice.

Maria
 
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Old 03-07-08, 05:18 AM
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we've installed pavers on some,,,

15% driveways &, 4yrs later, they're still in place,,, just place 'em correctly,,, we stak'd w/s/s angles on the low side every 15' as i recall.
 
  #6  
Old 03-07-08, 06:06 AM
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driveway anchored to house slab

After inspecting a few hundred Katrina damaged homes in LA and MS, I think you poblem would not be with pavers, but the based used.

Most problem in your area are due to the poor, unstable natural soil and the lack of preparation becofore building a house or road and not the surface materials.

Lack of preparation of the base is just as bad as not renailing all studs and plates after a flood.

Dick
 
 

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