bulging retain wall 6ft - 2ft cinder block


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Old 03-29-08, 09:22 AM
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bulging retain wall 6ft - 2ft cinder block

There is a garage under my house and on 1 side a retaining wall of cinder block that is 6ft down to 2ft. This wall is bulging badly and has cracks. Recent widow looking to avoid big problem. Do you think this wall should be replaced or do landscaping layers? At the base of the 6ft part close to house there is a sump pump with hose going out at least 50 feet to keep water from coming into garage. Looking for safest and least expensive suggestion. I have pictures but it would not let me attach them.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 08:09 AM
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See link to pics for above question. Could not find edit function.
http://s302.photobucket.com/albums/nn114/mshiffl/
 
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Old 03-30-08, 09:53 AM
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Hi,

Those photos are such a help!

The entire wall is leaning, so yes, I would replace. I see no drainage pipe from that area, so there is probably no gravel backfill, either.

If you have access to a bobcat (Or an affinity with your shovel), I'd knock down the wall, cut back the earth. If there's a footer under that wall, you may want to drill, insert rebar, and use a bonding agent to rebuild wall, being sure to use gravel and drain tile to keep water from pushing against the wall or draining onto drive.

You'll probably need more precise directions than I gave here, I just want to get you started in the right direction.

Connie
 
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Old 03-30-08, 10:16 AM
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bulging retain wall 6ft - 2ft cinder block

Your wall is not designed right, not built right and probably has an indequate or no footing. - Tear out the wall. You could replace the wall in the same location of move it slightly. You could also built it slightly lower if you slope the grade down toward the top of the wall.

It there is an old footing, you could possibly let it remain if it is a couple of feet down. This is if you replace the wall with a segmental retaining wall block wall that does not uused a concrete footing. These block are dry stacked (no mortar or reinforcement allowed) and they sit on a bed of compacted gravel base that could be used over the abandoned footing. You could also build several walls to create a terrace similar to the other side of the driveway, but that would take a few more block.

Take a look at the SRW sites (Allan Block, Anchor Wall Systems, Keystone and Versalok) for ideas products and instructions. These different companies have licensed producers in all states and most foreign countries. As you see the SRW walls work well with a variable height or curved walls.

Dick
 
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Old 03-30-08, 08:39 PM
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The wall was there when we bought the house 28 years ago so I have no idea what's within or under the wall. Maybe doing it like the other side of the driveway would be best for me. That side was done with railroad ties. It's coming to the right time of the year for this project.

I appreciate your comments. All of a sudden it started looking like it was going to go or maybe, being alone, I started paying attention.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 08:58 PM
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The existing blocks tie into the house - that's no good 'cause a wall is guaranteed to settle differently than the house. Cut them off I think. If the wall needs support from house foundation the wall isn't engineered properly, in my opinion.

I like your lion.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 09:34 PM
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bulging retain wall 6ft - 2ft cinder block

You definitely need to keep the new retaining wall separate from the existing home. I doubt that your existing failing wall is conntected to the house, but to be safe, a layer of gravel between the footing (if any) and a new wall would provide the necessary isolation.
 
 

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