Drainage ditch overflowing into yard


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Old 03-30-08, 10:15 AM
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Drainage ditch overflowing into yard

We have a drainage ditch that runs behind our back yard and then makes a 90 degree angle and runs down the side of the yard. That problem is that it was not properly done and there is to much water coming from the back drainage ditch. The 90 degree turn can not get rid of the water faster than it comes in and then it overflows into our driveway and yard. I was thinking about putting a retaining wall up in the back to try and give it more time to get through. We have fought with the city over this but have had not luck thus far. This has been an issue since we moved in about a year and a half ago. Any ideas on the best way to hold this water for more time to get through or alternative solutions would be greatly appreciated. We also brought in about 75 tons of dirt last summer to try help the water from overflowing. I hope I hear some possible solutions as I am becoming very frustrated with the situation. Pictures can be sent as well if someone would like to see more clearly what I am trying to describe.
Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 10:57 AM
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I think pics would be a great idea.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 12:09 PM
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Pics Added

I hope this helps a bit. If you need any other information please let me know. When you click on pic I have added description to try and help.

http://s258.photobucket.com/albums/h...age%20Problem/
 
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Old 03-30-08, 01:08 PM
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Wow, dj, that looks like a huge mess when it rains! That looks like a city or county problem, though. Have you talked to anyone official?
 
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Old 03-30-08, 01:24 PM
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I would think the municipality would have some (if not all) responsibility.

so, it is as simple as water cannot flow around the 90 and under the drive fast enough to prevent it from going over the drive, correct?

or do I have it backwards?

under the drive and the around the 90 then perpendicular to the road.


I think if you simply install a retaining wall, all you will succeed in doing is causing the pool to become larger while attempting to flow under the drive.

If my take of water flow direction is correct, I would suggest a larger culvert under the drive but I would also (although not needed to make this work) install a concrete barrier for the 90 turn area to prevent continued erosion of that area. Rip rap will also work but since it is basically largish rocks, it would tend to slow down the flow as it redirected the water and could cause a problem by itself.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 01:43 PM
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Drainage ditch overflowing into yard

Do you know where your property line is? You certainly do not want to get into a situation where you have built something on public land without permission.

Do what you can to keep the culvert clean and open.

Also, the more grass you have, the less runoff you will have.


Have you asked about getting another culvert installed? Two the same size would probably better than one large in this case, unless you want the ditch below the driveway to be deeper.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 03:01 PM
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We have talked to the city about this and they basically say that there is nothing they can do. We have asked them to continue the culvert under the road as the property on the other side of the road and beyond continues to grade. Does anyone know of any legal issues you can take if they continue to tell as there is nothing they can do. It washes out our dirt and rock and we are at a loss except for building a wall (not so sure know after previous message). We are planning on going to the city meeting, but I wanted to have a little more knowledge on the legal aspects before I raised my voice to loud. Any suggestions would be wonderful. We have been told that they can't put a bigger culvert in with no reason. Thank you all that have replied and I enjoy hearing your opinions on the legal issues.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 03:13 PM
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Nap,
Your assumptions were right in your previous post about the flow. It drains properly as long as we don't get a large amount in a short day. There could be a steady rain for 24 hours and not come over, but if we get an inch in a real short time here it comes....That is why I thought the wall may work.
 
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Old 03-30-08, 04:18 PM
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it sounds like it could but it seems as if it would simply expand the pooling, which would damage more grass area.

I believe the cure would be in enlarging the culvert under the drive. As concretemasonry suggested, I would think another small culvert would be better than 1 larger one. I believe a single large culvert may cause its own problems as well and would second concrete's suggestion.

We have been told that they can't put a bigger culvert in with no reason.
they have a reason. It is damaging your property the way it is.

the one thing not addressed here is;

is there adequate flow beyond you so you fixing your problem does not cause a problem with the next guy over or on down the line.

I live in a rural area and drainage ditches for the farmers fields are common. There are costs to the farmers but there are also costs born by the county in installing and maintaining the drainage system.

I would suspect the drainage system in your area would be treated in a similar fashion.

It may be beneficial to speak with an attorney in the area that could speak to specific rules and ordinances.
 
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Old 03-31-08, 01:25 PM
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Thanks to everyone for the information. Hopefully I can get something done with the city..
 
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Old 04-01-08, 08:01 AM
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I totally agree with the statements above that adding more culvert and a header at the street would help a lot. My take on the lack of support from the city is that it is nuisance water and no one is getting flooded. If you had full coverage turf in your lawn you would not get much if any erosion.
Does it ever overflow the street? If it does, then there is a strong case that the drainage is under engineered and they would have an obligation to improve the system. Take pictures of the overflow and document rain fall amounts each time.
 
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Old 04-01-08, 08:31 AM
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Drainage ditch overflowing into yard

Without knowing where the property lines are and what the real elevations/slopes are, I see a couple of strange things;

1. You have a lot of runoff from your yard due to the surfaces.

2. What is the source of the runoff coming into the ditch before the 90 degree turn? - How many other homes?

3. Your driveway seems to be below the street, so water can be collected in the drive and run off into the ditch at the downstream end of the culvert.

4. The water below the culvert will limit the flow through the culvert because there is not enough slope.

5. There may no place to drain the ditch below the culvert without the construction of a new, deeper storm sewer due to the flat land with little drainage. - Big $$$$s.

When you contact the city, do it in person with photographs.

Do you noe your councilman?

Anytime you have such a flat area, it does not take much water to create a localized problem. The faster you move water from one location to another, you create a bigger problem downstream. - That is the reason flood control is often accomplished by using retention areas.
 
 

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