Need to set concrete in water

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  #1  
Old 06-17-08, 12:28 PM
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Need to set concrete in water

I am putting up a chain link fence in my back yard. A portion of my yard is very soggy. I have dug the holes and a few of the holes have standing water in them (I guess a very high water table). Of course, my luck, one of the Terminal Post Holes that will be used for a 95 foot run is filled with water 3/4 of the way. I cannot remove this water, it just fills back up again. How do I go about pouring concrete in this hole that will eventually set up good?

I am not very experienced with working with concrete. I am thinking Quikrete wouldn't set due to the water constantly being there. I am thinking about making the hole larger, fill a 5 Gallon bucket of concrete with the post in it then filling in around it. I am hoping there is a better way because I have about 3 - 4 holes that are pretty wet.

Thanks,
Kash
 
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  #2  
Old 06-17-08, 12:33 PM
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Fence posts in Water Filled Hole, solution??

I have dug my holes and a few of them are filled with water. How do I go about setting posts in the holes that have water in them? I cannot remove the water, its the water table. It's a chain link fence, the worst hole is a terminal post, I have about 3 - 4 more line post holes that are very wet or have a little bit of water in them. Any proven methods on setting posts in these types of holes? I am at a lost, I don;t think concrete will set up in these wet conditions.

Thanks,
Kash
 
  #3  
Old 06-17-08, 01:17 PM
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Concrete will set just fine under water. The best way to do it is to use a sleeve to place the concrete in the bottom of the hole first, then displace the water, rather than simply pouring it in, although that will work too.
 
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Old 06-17-08, 01:20 PM
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Let's see if the pro masons hop on. In the meantime, it is my understanding that portland cement becomes concrete through a reaction to water, and actually sets best when kept wet.
I would try mixing a test batch for one hole and packing the cement paste in as solidly as possible. Then let it cure a few days and check.
 
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Old 06-17-08, 02:02 PM
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Need to set concrete in water

TS has the right idea. It is done frequently on bridge foundations too.

The important thing is to keep the bottom of the hose, (sleeve, elephant trunk or what ever you call it) below the concrete level. Put concrete in the bottom through the sleeve and continue to pour concrete it. The concrete will go directly into the other concrete and will force the water up. As you pour, keep the bottom of the sleeve in the concrete until you reach the desired top of the concrete.

The concrete should be slightly above the ground and have the top slope away to shed water. The wood rots from the alternating wetting and drying and not from the concrete that maintains a uniform moisture level.
 
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Old 06-17-08, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry View Post
TS has the right idea. It is done frequently on bridge foundations too.

The important thing is to keep the bottom of the hose, (sleeve, elephant trunk or what ever you call it) below the concrete level. Put concrete in the bottom through the sleeve and continue to pour concrete it. The concrete will go directly into the other concrete and will force the water up. As you pour, keep the bottom of the sleeve in the concrete until you reach the desired top of the concrete.

The concrete should be slightly above the ground and have the top slope away to shed water. The wood rots from the alternating wetting and drying and not from the concrete that maintains a uniform moisture level.
Sorry, I am just about clueless with concrete. What I gather from what you guys are saying is that I need to fill the hole from the bottom up. Should I mi the conrete dryer than usual? Some additional clarification would be great.

Thanks,
Kash
 
  #7  
Old 06-17-08, 02:59 PM
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Dump a bag or two of concrete mix in there.

++ I noticed you made another thread regarding this so I merged the two. Please bookmark this thread for future questions. A few posts may seem out of order depending on the time posted++
 

Last edited by HotxxxxxxxOKC; 06-17-08 at 03:39 PM. Reason: merge threads
  #8  
Old 06-17-08, 05:33 PM
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Don't mix the concrete before you put it in the hole. Just pour it in dry. The dry concrete will displace the water, but absorb enough that it will set up fine.
Many fence companies set all their posts in powdered concrete mix only, relying on the ground's moisture to make it set.

Pecos
 
  #9  
Old 06-17-08, 08:22 PM
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Many fence companies do it wrong, Pecos. Without adequate mixing, you have stabilized soil at best, unpacked granular aggregate at worst. You would do better packing the soil back in.
 
  #10  
Old 06-18-08, 07:22 PM
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Tscarborough, have you ever seen a bag of concrete mix that was exposed to rain? It is a very solid chunk. More than stable enough to hold a post. However, your way is fine too. Just more work than necessary in my opinion.

Pecos
 
  #11  
Old 06-19-08, 07:56 AM
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It is easier to soup your concrete up for placement, but that doesn't make it the correct or best way to do it.
 
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Old 06-19-08, 06:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
Concrete will set just fine under water. The best way to do it is to use a sleeve to place the concrete in the bottom of the hole first, then displace the water, rather than simply pouring it in, although that will work too.
"rather than simply pouring it in, although that will work too" your words.
How is mixing water with concrete, then pouring it into a hole to displace more water better than pouring it in dry and letting it absorb some of the water? Your way, the concrete gets much more soupy. I fail to see your logic.
The way to completely get rid of the water issue is to put a plastic garbage bag over the water-filled hole, fill the bag with mixed concrete, and let that displace the water. The "hole water" will never touch the mixed concrete.
Your original way, my original response, and this way would all be perfectly acceptable for setting a post. It ain't rocket science.
 
  #13  
Old 06-19-08, 07:03 PM
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It is if you are building a rocket.

No matter, either way will work for the OP, but as a rule I will only advise on the best way I know how to do something.

The rule is:

If you specify what is minimally required, the end result will be mediocre at best. If you specify the best possible materials and method, the actual installation has a lot more "slop" factor and a much greater chance of success when done by someone unfamiliar with the process.
 
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Old 06-19-08, 07:24 PM
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Don't get me wrong, Pecos, you know more about concrete than me, and almost as much as Pops, but I will argue with him, too.
 
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