Putting a new foundation under an existing House


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Old 09-25-08, 02:44 PM
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Putting a new foundation under an existing House

I have recently bought a house and I am planning on doing a lot of foundation work to it. Here's some history about the house. The house is an A-Frame and was built on cedar piers instead of a poured foundation. Now the piers have started to rot out from the bottom because of water damage. I want to replace these peirs with a foundation but I am having trouble deciding what kind of a foundation will be best for it. I originally had planned to do the footer in sections and support the house with block walls, but I am not sure if a footer that is not continuous would be wise even if I was to use rebar to connect different footers. My most recent idea was to go with what the builder had in mind and that was to replace the piers with either concrete block peirs or steel I-beams with concrete at the base of each pier. Does anybody have ideas to this predicament of mine?
 
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Old 09-25-08, 08:36 PM
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i think that the best bet would be to run steel i beams under the house and place them on concrete piers. what part of the country do you live in? is it mountainous or hilly, wet?

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Old 09-26-08, 09:44 AM
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I live in northeast tennessee and the house is on a hillside so the cedar piers under the house now are all different hieghts. I had planned on replacing the cedar piers with I-beam piers and then framing in the walls with 2x6's. Does the concrete footers have to be poured all at once or can they be poured in sections such as having a footer that went under the whole perimeter continuously instead of at the base of each pier? Thanks for your post.
 
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Old 09-26-08, 06:28 PM
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you can pour in sections but be sure that you use rebar to tie them together, it should overlap at least 12 times its diameter for proper hold..
best would be a monolithic pour

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Old 09-26-08, 06:31 PM
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the footers base can not slope where it contacts the ground. that will cause them to slide downhill, slowly but surely

Murphy was an optimist
 
 

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