footing depth?

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-10-08, 07:14 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,155
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
footing depth?

I have to build cripple walls to support floor joists that were hung incorrectly many years ago. The walls will be in a crawlspace that now is almost completely surrounded by additions with only about a 5' section having exposure to the outside. I have unprotected water lines running in this area and they have never frozen. I was working out the plans for the wall with guys at 84lumber and they said that I need to dig 30" deep footers. This seemed way too deep. That is frost depth in this area. I was thinking more along lines of 12". I really don't think that frost heaving is a concern here. I will also have HVAC running through this area (but of course no outlets in the crawlspace). I would think that the heat loss from the ducts as well as the fact that space is surround from outside for the most part and since my water lines have never frozen --all of these seem to tell me that I do not need frost depth. I could even through up some insulation on the one small section of wall. Heck, the interior footing supporting my whole house didn't specify footings that deep-they were only spec'd at 8" deep and then a 4"slab which the columns sit on top of for total of 12" concrete. this is a 11' x 11' room with only floor weight on the joists that I will be supporting.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-10-08, 07:31 AM
OhioDraft's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 157
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
all of these seem to tell me that I do not need frost depth
ultimately, as i'm sure you're aware, that is the decision of your building officials.

and yes, 8" is very standard, and is what i see/spec 95% time residentially. but keep in mind that these footings are under a wall that is 2'6" below grade.

but really, i'm not even entirely convinced that a footing is even necessary. i'd certainly look into that notion first.
 
  #3  
Old 10-10-08, 07:42 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,155
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hey you again Ohio Draft. thanks. I actually thought of just putting down some cinderblocks and putting the columns on them. Is that what you were thinking? As far as building officials, I am not sure they really need to be involved. This house is 108 years old and the area that I am looking to support was an addition so not sure how old it is but it is built with lumber that is true 2" wide-that means it has been standing for a long time just the way it is. I just don't like the way it was done and there is some splitting of joists (they notched them over sill plate). If I get them involved, they may want complete engineered drawings as well!
 
  #4  
Old 10-10-08, 08:04 AM
OhioDraft's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 157
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
columns? well that would probably necessitate footings for the point loads. a wall would distribute what small (relatively) amount of weight that little room would bring down, which is what i thought you were doing. either way, your right about the code guys, they would probably want something in writing from a PE. But hey, you've been here long enough to decide whether or not you need to involve them.

also the concrete may be pretty old, who knows what the compressive strength is.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: