Stone Work Q's...


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Old 05-12-09, 06:58 PM
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Stone Work Q's...

Good day! I'm brand new to the website but I've taken a look at most of the threads and I've found quite a bit of help already.

I'm planning on building a new house shortly and I've noticed, in that neighborhood, a lot of the houses have stucco siding and beautiful stone work on the outside. I'm wondering, how difficult is it to do your own stone work (i.e. cutting the stone, fitting it nicely, etc..). I've heard its as simple as buying a large wet saw and simply taking your time. Also, I've heard you simply use regular thin set to make the stone adhere to the wall.

Here's my newest question. Can a person invest a little money in a superior wet stone saw and simply do the work himself? How would someone begin attacking a project like this?

Help~!
 
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Old 05-12-09, 11:19 PM
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I've heard its as simple as buying a large wet saw and simply taking your time. Also, I've heard you simply use regular thin set to make the stone adhere to the wall.
Yep thats all it takes to be a stone mason now a days

Is this cultures stone or quarried stone

Its not as easy at it seems to get the right look.
 
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Old 05-13-09, 05:28 AM
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I have heard that all it takes to do a painting is to buy some paint and brushes and put it on a canvas.
 
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Old 05-13-09, 08:43 AM
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Like this on. I am sure that these people think that they have improved their property, but they have not:

 
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Old 05-13-09, 09:28 AM
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Like any skilled trade, just about anyone can do it. It just takes practice and experience. I did the real stone veneer on the foundation of my house. Luckily I started on the back corner that is least visible and by the time I got around to the front I knew what I was doing... and I've never done it again.
 
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Old 05-13-09, 09:43 AM
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Tscar...man, that is one heck of an uglification job. Nice garage doors, nice trim around the windows, nice stucco texture, even the decorative squares and stars look ok....and then theres the randomly stuck on stone..yeck!
 
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Old 05-15-09, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
I have heard that all it takes to do a painting is to buy some paint and brushes and put it on a canvas.
Thanks for the wonderful insight Tscar...
So, is it regular thin set that is used? I like the look of cultured stone moreso then quarry.
 
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Old 05-15-09, 11:00 AM
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The actual application of adhered veneer is simple. The important thing is to make sure that the details are done correctly. Details in a construction sense, that is. Properly designed flashing, for example, and sill details. For that most of the manufacturers have detail books, use them. It will be easier on new construction to make sure they are done correctly; often on retrofit, there is no practical way to do it.

Good luck and full steam ahead!
 
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Old 05-18-09, 08:51 PM
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THanks so much Tscar. The terminology you used has given me a place to start searching for information. I'll be sure to look into all of this before even purchasing stone. Aside from properly installed flashing / sills, is there anything else you can think of i should look into?
 
 

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