Concrete truck can't access driveway, pour options


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Old 05-30-09, 12:39 PM
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Concrete truck can't access driveway, pour options

My back yard is generally only accessible by driveway that is approximately 150 feet away from road. 50 feet of this distance is sloped at 1:6 (1 V to 6 H). Need to pour footers and slab for a 22 x 24 foot garage floor which I guess would take 7-8 yards for slab and up to 10 yds for the footers. If the concrete truck could get up the drive it could only go about half way, but I am concerned that the weight would crumble the blacktop drive.

Suggestion to move concrete from truck on the road to the building site are requested. I have a ford ranger pickup which I was wondering if there was a way to use it to transport up the hill, otherwise i am considering equipment rental (concrete buggie), wheelbarrow, etc. Any suggestion are appreciated.
 
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Old 05-30-09, 12:58 PM
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Hi Ken, I would have someone with a pump truck take a look at your situation. Some could possibly reach your work area.

Bud
 
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Old 05-30-09, 01:04 PM
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Thanks

What would you expect to pay for one, Thanks again
 
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Old 05-30-09, 01:22 PM
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the pick up truck is not a great idea. Too much dead time for the concrete truck. You should check in to waiting time costs long before seriously considering such a method.

along the same method of the pumper truck is a conveyor truck. Not sure but I believe the conveyor is less expensive (notice; I did not say cheaper 'cuz neither one is cheap).

I would suggest quite a few strong guys with wheelbarrows (lots of hard work and actually quite slow going especially as fatigue sets in.

not quite as many guys with Georgia buggies.

but you would most likely be best served (and actually maybe the least expensive in the end) a pumper or conveyor truck.
 
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Old 05-30-09, 02:01 PM
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With a contractor type wheelbarrow. that's 6 cubic feet (not full--5 cf.) / 8 yards concrete = 27cf. per yrd. = 6 trips x 8 yrds. = 48 trips, plus the truck wait fee...... Hire a line pumper, not a boom. Call locally for prices. Be safe, G
 
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Old 05-30-09, 02:30 PM
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can you define the difference between a line pumper and a boom truck?
 
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Old 05-30-09, 02:51 PM
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If you aren't comfortable pulling the mixer truck onto the drive, then the next best option would probably be a power buggy or bobcat. I use one or the other on almost every inaccessible job I do. It's simple to control where you dump it and how fast.
I have pulled concrete trucks onto many asphalt drives with no problem, but it's always a risk as to cracking/pulverizing the drive. I personally wouldn't consider a concrete pump a great option for this application. The reason being that after the footings, etc. are filled, you still have 150 ft of hose full of concrete. They don't put this back in the truck and haul it away. They empty it out on your lot and it's up to you to get rid of it somehow. There's the mess from washing the pump truck out as well.
A boom pump can reach distant areas from the air (a hose is connected to a boom on the pump truck). It can reach over the top of a house. A line pump has steel tubes connected with splices and runs along the ground. The end has a hose on it to discharge the concrete.
I really can't see how your pickup truck could be of any use whatsoever. Good luck.
 

Last edited by Pecos; 05-30-09 at 03:01 PM. Reason: additional info
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Old 05-30-09, 04:45 PM
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ah, sounds like the perfect use of a conveyor truck then. When you are reaching the end of the pour, the operator simply stops loading concrete on the belt and runs off what is there. Then, if more is needed, they load some more on and run the belt to deliver it to you.

and tada!!! no big pile from a boom hose washout or line truck washout.

still have the truck wash down though.
 
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Old 05-30-09, 05:04 PM
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If a concrete truck can't access the drive due to weight, how could a conveyor truck? Most of the weight comes from the concrete, not the truck. I don't think they can stretch 150 feet either, or that they are necessarily so common as to be found in most towns/cities. However, I could be wrong.
 
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Old 05-30-09, 09:16 PM
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a conveyor trucks conveyor is suspended just as a boom truck would be. Here is one of the biggest and yes, it is only 120 feet so it may not be adequate.

Truck-Mounted Telescopic Conveyors - Telebelts: Products: Putzmeister Concrete Pumping Products

and here is a 130 footer

Conveyors Pumps Cranes, Certified Union Operators - Team Cassidy

I live in a city of 100,000 people and there is one in my area so I would not think they are that unusual.
 
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Old 06-28-09, 12:28 PM
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I just poured 6.5 meters of aggregate..uphill to the rear of the house and land.
The rear steps were poured off the lane but the rest was boomed up to the house along with a line at the end of the boom to reach further up, than from off the lane...
.

.

.
What an eventfull day....phew.!!
 
 

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