Monolithic vs "Conventional" Slab


  #1  
Old 07-16-09, 06:21 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Monolithic vs "Conventional" Slab

I am building a 10' x 12', possibly 10' x 16', garden/shop shed in NC. Frost level is 12".

In your opinion would a "conventional" 4" thick slab work or should I pour a monolithic slab with the edges down at least 12"? Or a "conventional" that is thinner or thicker than 4"?

Not sure how much frost heave will really affect a shed foundation.

We also probably only have <30 days of freezing temps here.

Also, what's the best base material for either method? 3/4" drainage stone, crusher run?

Also will be lining the outside perimeter with some drainage pipe.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 07-16-09, 02:45 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That is a pretty small building, so you can get away with more.

Since you have a 2' frost depth one option is a stem wall on a footing (block or concrete). Inside of the stem wall, you can pour a 4" floating slab (wire mesh and not tied to the walls) on a compacted base. The height of the stem can be determined by your use.

If it is a utility building, you may wish to have the top of the stem 4"-6" above the finished floor to provide a "clean" exposed concrete/block wall surface that allows easy cleaning and get the wood a little higher above the soil and rot/moisture. This also allows you to slab the interior slab slightly for drainage and cleaning.

We have colder temperatures, but this is preferred around here.

You can always build with a monolithic slab/structural floor (reinforced) and let it float with any soil heaves.

Dick
 
  #3  
Old 07-17-09, 05:40 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The frost level is only 12".

So, it would be ok if the floor floats with any frost heaves? I assume the reinforcement would need to include rebar and wire mesh?

Does it need to be a monolithic pour if the intent is to let it float or would a reinforced 4" slab be ok? Or 5" or 6"?

The heaviest piece of equipment I would have potentially would be a zero turn mower, although I don't even have one right now.

Also, I'm looking at going with one of those 1yd rental trailers for delivery. Since the slab will call for an amount above that, can I make the pour in two trips without the first batch setting up before I can pour the second. I live about 3 miles from the site.

Thanks for the response
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: