Concrete Resurfacing Suggestions Needed


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Old 08-19-09, 08:53 AM
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Concrete Resurfacing Suggestions Needed

I have an old concrete walkway that has been patched together over the years with rotting wood in between the individual sections. Also, some of the original sections have small river rock embedded in the surface. I'd like to unify the sections (eliminate the wood dividers) and resurface it all. Would it be possible to fill the gaps where the wood is now with concrete and then put a resurfacing product on top of everything to give it all a uniform look? I'm worried that cracks would develop, but I want to avoid having to tear everything out and start over from scratch. Any suggestions on what to do with this?



Thanks!
 
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Old 08-20-09, 05:39 PM
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Those products don't last very long. Removing the wood & filling it with cement elininates your expansion joints which are needed. Completely remove the sections that you don't like, which is probably the sections with the blue stone & intall new.
 
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Old 08-21-09, 09:11 AM
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It's not just the sections with the stone on them that I want to change. The sections are totally patchwork and not the same size or divided up equally so I'd like to get everything looking more even. Since I'm also in the midst of remodeling almost every other part of the house, I'm hoping to find an inexpensive alternative to jack-hammering and removing 300 square feet of concrete walkway and replacing it all. Even if it only lasts a couple of years, I would probably be fine with that. Is tearing it all out and replacing really my only option here?
 
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Old 08-21-09, 03:58 PM
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Removing & replacing everything is not your only option but it's the best thing to do because you will never have to touch it again. You could use pavers instead of pouring new cement. That would save some money, if you're really stuck. Last year I was hired to remove one of those resurfacing products on the side of a stoop. I don't remember the name of it but it only lasted about 7 years. Compare the price of resurfacing to the price of installing pavers & make a decision.
 
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Old 08-21-09, 04:04 PM
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I thought about doing pavers, but it's not the look I'm after and would still require removing all the existing concrete which is what I was hoping to avoid. If I could get 3-5 years out of a resurfacing product, I would be happy so long as it doesn't cost a fortune. I have yet to look into that yet so maybe that's the deciding factor. I might just have to live with it as it is for a few years.
 
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Old 08-21-09, 04:20 PM
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I would be able to do the pavers or cement myself but I don't know if I could do the resurfacing. If the price of resurfacing even comes close to the cost of cement, due to the labor factor, then it's a no brainer.
 
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Old 08-21-09, 04:29 PM
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From what I've bee able to tell, I should be able to do the resurfacing myself. I know Quickrete makes a product designed for homeowner use and I was thinking I could try that.

I wonder if I could cut some slots in the sections that I want to join together, drop some short lengths of rebar in the slots to join the sections together, and then fill the gaps between the sections (where the wood is now) and the slots with the rebar with new concrete. I could still leave some of the joints for expansion an just combine a few of the sections to clean it all up.
 
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Old 08-21-09, 05:31 PM
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I guess there isn't too much to lose then. Try it. You can always remove it at a later date. Chop out the wood. Put expansion joints in instead. Fill the gaps the way you described. Then try the resurfacing product.

I just thought of something. You may have to pressure wash it first. I know that's true if you were doing a driveway. The resurfacing product won't stick if there is oil or grease. The surface has to be clean.
 
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Old 08-21-09, 07:38 PM
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From what I've bee able to tell, I should be able to do the resurfacing myself. I know Quickrete makes a product designed for homeowner use and I was thinking I could try that.
Glory stomper. I really don't know why you won't do this right as Pulpo stated. He gave perfect advice here. I do this for a living and second that advice. We also use resurfacing products for factories etc. They hold up and should simply because resurfacing is 3 times more in product per square foot then actual concrete. Its not in the big box stores

What ever you put on there in material and time spent will be a total waste and it will drive you nuts eventually when it falls apart like it is now. Do it right and get another 30+ years out of the walk.
 
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Old 08-24-09, 08:37 AM
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I'm in the process of remodeling the entire house so my budget is stretched already. That's why I was hoping to find an easy and inexpensive way to improve the look of the walk and thought resurfacing could be it. I know tearing it out and replacing it is the best solution, but the quotes I'm getting for that are around $5k for 200 s.f. and I just don't want to spend that kind of money on it at this stage. But I also don't want to do something that's going to fall apart.

It looks like the best choice here is to simply leave it alone and maybe replace the existing wood with some small rock or something else that won't rot. Then tear it all out and redo it in a few years when I can justify a big expense.
 
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Old 08-24-09, 02:26 PM
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If it can wait until you can do it correctly, then put that part of the remodeling on hold.
 
 

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