How to flash a brick chimney to the walls of a house


  #1  
Old 10-23-09, 11:17 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How to flash a brick chimney to the walls of a house

Hi Folks,
I have a small standard wood construction addition to my house. When I had the foundation poured for the addition, I had the mason do a concrete pedastal for a chimney, which I planned to build later for a wood burning stove.
I now want to build the chimney and am wondering if someone can tell me or refer me to a book on how to flash the brick chimney to the vertical wood exterior wall. there are plenty of how to's on flashing the chimney when as it goes through the roof. But what is the proper way to flash the chimney to the wall and the shingles ( i have red cedar perfection shingles as the siding)
Any guidance would be appreciated.

thanks, Rick
 
  #2  
Old 11-03-09, 10:06 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Idaho
Posts: 14
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
flashing

as far as I know (which is a LOT lol) you dont need to "flash" a chimney all the way up the wall. are you thinking of wall ties?
if you are, then here it goes... depends on your climate and the location of your chimney. if your chimney comes through near the peak then wall ties every 2 feet will be sufficient. make sure you hit studs. nailing to the siding wont do. If your chimney is at the bottom of your roof. reenforcing will be needed if you get a lot of snow. if snows an issue, this is how I build it..... LOTS of angle iron!!! lag bolt angle iron every 2 feet into studs. run pencil rod through the angle and tie it onto the chimney. I'm being vague here as I dont know what type of chimney your building. if its made of chimney block, I would fill the corners with mud and place 4' rebar every 2 feet.which is also what I would tie the pencil rod to. brick fireplaces are tougher as you dont have a place for rebar.... but youDO have the advantage of bulk. masonry suppliers have tie systems to fit nearly every application. As long as its not used brick. new brick have holes in them. use them for your ties so you can get some horizontal resistance. I live where theres LOTS of snow and I spend 1/2 my spring rebuilding fallen chimneys... new or old a chimney is no match for lots of heavy wet snow.... unless I build it. lol
ps standard wall ties are galvenized corrugated pieces of metel with holes in them for nailing into wood. they come with different thicknesses.. go with the heavier ties.
it was 19 degrees when I woke up this morning.......
 
  #3  
Old 11-03-09, 05:42 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 28
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You will be removing the side wall shingles in the area the chimney is constructed.
Then I would put a trim board along the chimney and shingle back up to the board. Use a high quality caulk to seal everything up then.
That is the only detail I have ever seen used in this situation.
 
  #4  
Old 11-07-09, 08:33 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Guys,

thanks very much for the info. I live on Long Island NY and the winters are not very severe, so it sounds like I can get away with the galvanized corrugated ties back to the house.
Should I seal the finished product with anything to prevent water from penetrating and then freezing cracking the chimney?

Also, the ceramic square tubes that run up the center of it, should I fill the void between the ceramic and brick with mortar or sand ?

I really appreciate your advice, guys !

Rick
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: