pre cast natural stone


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Old 11-21-09, 11:23 AM
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pre cast natural stone

Putting this stuff up behind my woodburning fireplace just for looks - don't need any structural integrity at all. My question is, they recommend putting this up with mortor, was wondering if you could use Liquid Nails versus the mortor to reduce the weight of the wall and time of install. Any input would help.
thanks
 
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Old 11-21-09, 11:52 AM
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Welcome to the forums! No, I would use the mortar as suggested. You won't be adding any weight to the wall that the lath can't handle on a vertical basis. Are you using dry stack or will you be mortaring between the rock? You won't be saving any installation time by not doing it right. And make sure you have proper clearance betwen your fireplace and the combustible surfaces.
 
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Old 11-21-09, 01:17 PM
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Thanks Chandler. Yes I'm using dry stack. The cast natural stone recommends using a 60 pound bag per 5 sq ft of coverage . I have 105 square feet I'm covering. This seems kind of like overkill for just a visual look. I put Liquid Nails on my bottom sill plate on my basement walls, and had to remove one for one of my mistakes - and it pulled a 1/2 inch chunk of concrete up with it. I'm probably overthinking this - but it seemed like it would be easier to just squirt a little Liquid Nails on and be done. But - I could be wrong. Thanks
 
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Old 11-22-09, 05:26 AM
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I'd read the coverage again. Is it Type S mortar, or stucco mix? If type S, you need to add sand to it, and it will cover much more than 5 sq feet. Now, mixed with sand and gravel, it will probably make a 5 sq ft x 3" deep footing, but sans the gravel, you have a mortar mix, not concrete. What is your backing? Are you using lath?
 
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Old 11-22-09, 07:32 PM
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If you want to stand there and hold each piece in place until the liquid nails sets (30 minutes plus), go for it! The mortar takes an almost instant set as the moisture is drawn out by the stone and the scratchcoat.
 
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Old 12-15-09, 06:47 AM
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I have to agree with the other members in that being in the business for many yrs. I have yet to build with natural stone or cultured stone using liquid nails . As a matter of fact I've only just heard about this product in the last few yrs. .Maybe I'm getting too old and behind the times. That's not to say that it can't be done , It just doesn't seem practical. My suggestion to you is that you stick with the manufacturer's recommendations and go with the mortar. Type "S" is a good strong mortar .Being that it's inside and not exposed to weather or has any structural properties Type "N" would also be a good choice . Sand must be added to these types . If you choose the mortar with the sand already added all you need do is add water and get to work
 
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Old 12-15-09, 02:25 PM
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I never understood why go with precast natural stone when you can use real natural stone or rock and stone panels.
 
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Old 12-15-09, 05:31 PM
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Precast stone

There's a difference between precast,cultured and natural stone . In reading the initial post , precast natural stone was mentioned then dry stacking using wire mesh, that's cultured stone. Precast stone and cultured stone are manufactured products. Natural stone like granite or limestone come from the earth. The question of why use precast or cultured when you can use natural . My own theory is that prior to the invent of precast stone & cultured (which came much later) we stonemasons laid the natural material from out of the earth . We had to serve an apprenticeship (4 yrs.) Today, with the invention of cultured stone , my wife can do it . It may not look like my work , but she can still do it. Therefore, today with all the TV shows and DI Yourselfers , Cultured stone has made it possible for the average person to do the work himself without having to hire a professional . Precast on the other hand is a little more involved and requires more know how. Natural stone requires more skill yet but looks great when done properly .Structural values for the project must also be considered when using either Precast or Natural or Cultured stone
 
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Old 12-18-09, 05:16 AM
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I would not use liquid nail. I do understand not wanting to go the scratch coat and lath method, especially inside of your house. You can use durrock, or any other concrete based tile backer board instead and do the cutting outside. The big box stores, Lowe's, or Home depot, carry a type "S" mortar mix that already has the mortar and sand in it, just add water and go! Good luck.

Vince.
 
 

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