Concrete Expansion Joint Replacement

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-20-10, 01:13 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Concrete Expansion Joint Replacement

First of all, I hope I put this in the right area.

I have 2 expansion joints that I need to replace. Original material is disintigrating and allowing water under the drive which causes it to raise in the winter.

I cannot see buying cases of silicone caulking to fill these. Just not cost effective.

I have seen 2 products that I would like to get some input on.

One is "Arrow Joint" the other is "Slab Gasket"

They both work very similar. You force them down into the expansion joint and they fill the void.

They both are very similar in price.

What I would like to know if anyone as any experience with either/both of these products? Which one do you prefer?

Is there another method that I should be looking at to fill this joint?

I live in Ohio, so we get heat in he summer and snow and cold in the winter. Needs to be able to handle the expansion and contraction of the concrete, abuse of a snow shovel and snow blower.

Thanks

Bob
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-21-10, 05:07 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Why would it take cases of silicone? How big are they?
 
  #3  
Old 01-21-10, 07:18 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The Expansion Joint goes completely across the driveway and is about 7/8" to 1" in size. I can fill in the depthwith sand. But it will take "Cases" to fill it.
I would have to fill the joint to about 1" deep completely across the drive (approx 20')

That is why it would take cases.

Bob
 
  #4  
Old 01-21-10, 08:26 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,857
Received 644 Votes on 596 Posts
Most concrete mixing plants sell supplies, so I'd suggest you go there and get some backer rod for your gaps. It needs to fit tight so take accurate measurements of your gaps and get more than one size if needed. You should leave at least 3/8-1/2" of depth for the sealant. And you might get the big quart tubes of expansion joint sealant, they go farther and are a better value.

If you want to do a really neat job, carefully stay within the lines and do not overfill the joint, but fill the edges completely. A wide gap like that I will usually run 2 fat beads down each side, trying to make a nice straight line and seal along each side. If you can't caulk straight, mask off each side with masking tape to confine the mess. Take some paint thinner and your finger to wet the surface and smooth it until it's flat and flush. That way you won't have any edge sticking up to catch on a snow shovel. Tooling it also forces it down tight against the backer rod and against the sides of the joint, eliminating voids and ensuring a good bond. After you have it all smoothed flat I think it looks nice if you generously sprinkle clean silica sand over the caulk. Gives it a nice texture and color.
 
  #5  
Old 01-22-10, 07:30 AM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Actuall expansion joints are cheap & easy to cut if you can fit them in the space.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: