'bagging' interior brick wall


  #1  
Old 04-15-00, 03:07 AM
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We have an interior brick wall with a fireplace in it. The brick is rather plain, so we'd like to paint it, perhaps in a lively color. Before that, we'd like to plaster it a bit (a process known here in Australia as 'bagging') to give it that Tuscan brick wall look (where the brick work is still evident, but much more subtle). Does anyone know about this process? Is it easy for a DIY-er?
Are there any on-line resources that I can consult? Any gotchas to worry about?

Many Thanks,

Martin
 
  #2  
Old 04-15-00, 07:05 PM
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Being the curious sort, (in construction terms and processes from around the World), and never having heard the term "bagging" before, I performed a quick Web search, and may have found informational sources for you.

In return, I ask one small favor: describe "sydney sand". (I am generally aware that Australia has a number of colored sands, but I am curious about sydney sand). Send to wwwemail@go.com or post here for all to see. Thanks!
BTW, I know bagging as stuccoing (after conversion from rendering).

Description of the process: "tuscan brick" (includes ingredient formula for mix) from Burke's Backyard, PO Box 929 Willoughby, NSW 2068 (The content of the magazine is strongly Australian). http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/fac...rden/barbecue-
makeover_27.html

Australian DIY Web site ("bagging how to" with graphics) Uses ready mix "Melcann Mortar" manufactured by Swane Cement. http://www.qcd.com.au/solutions/s_diy_a.htm
Swane Cement: http://www.adbri.com.au/abcl/swan.html#range

A cement paint alternative: http://www.porters.com.au/boncote.htm

The only things that I might add to bagging:
Because stucco or "render" is cement based it should be damp cured by misting for at least three days, and be protected from wind or heat sources. Damp curing helps to control shrink cracks (rapid loss of surface moisture or the substrate absorbing water from the mix are two causes). The other major cause of shrink cracks is excessive water in the mix. Stucco or bagging needs to be looser than other cementious mixes, but avoid making "soup". Water should not ooze from the mix while you're troweling. If you can imagine the consistency of a medium "mud pie mix", that would be a good starting point. If you have difficulty in troweling an old trick is to add one or two drops of Liquid Ivory Soap to the mix water. A newer product that does the same thing is "Easy Spread". If it's unavailable in Australia, I am sure there are similar products available.
 
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Old 04-16-00, 08:04 AM
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Humm..... I decided to see what else I could find on "bagging".
From the University of Sydney:
BAGGING Dry bagging
Preparation: Cut joints flush before bagging.
Application: Apply laying mortar to the surface using a hessian bag or similar. Flush up irregularities, but leave the minimum amount of mortar on the surface.
Textured bagging Preparation:
Cut joints flush before bagging.
Application: Apply laying mortar to the surface using a sponge float. Flush up irregularities, but leave approximately 2mm of mortar on the surface.
When initial set is reached, texture using a hand bristle brush.

An interesting technique, one that I will try.
 
  #4  
Old 04-18-00, 05:19 PM
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quote:<HR>Originally posted by 2000:
Being the curious sort, (in construction terms and processes from around the World), and never having heard the term "bagging" before, I performed a quick Web search, and may have found informational sources for you.

In return, I ask one small favor: describe "sydney sand". (I am generally aware that Australia has a number of colored sands, but I am curious about sydney sand). Send to wwwemail@go.com or post here for all to see. Thanks!
BTW, I know bagging as stuccoing (after conversion from rendering).

Description of the process: "tuscan brick" (includes ingredient formula for mix) from Burke's Backyard, PO Box 929 Willoughby, NSW 2068 (The content of the magazine is strongly Australian). http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/fac...rden/barbecue-
makeover_27.html

Australian DIY Web site ("bagging how to" with graphics) Uses ready mix "Melcann Mortar" manufactured by Swane Cement. http://www.qcd.com.au/solutions/s_diy_a.htm
Swane Cement: http://www.adbri.com.au/abcl/swan.html#range

A cement paint alternative: http://www.porters.com.au/boncote.htm

The only things that I might add to bagging:
Because stucco or "render" is cement based it should be damp cured by misting for at least three days, and be protected from wind or heat sources. Damp curing helps to control shrink cracks (rapid loss of surface moisture or the substrate absorbing water from the mix are two causes). The other major cause of shrink cracks is excessive water in the mix. Stucco or bagging needs to be looser than other cementious mixes, but avoid making "soup". Water should not ooze from the mix while you're troweling. If you can imagine the consistency of a medium "mud pie mix", that would be a good starting point. If you have difficulty in troweling an old trick is to add one or two drops of Liquid Ivory Soap to the mix water. A newer product that does the same thing is "Easy Spread". If it's unavailable in Australia, I am sure there are similar products available.
<HR>


thanks for the tips: I should have known that Burke's Backyard would have some info. But, sorry, I can't help much "sydney sand". If you're referring to the stuff on the beach at Bondi, I confess that I've never been there. If you mean a construction material, I haven't done enough to hear a reference to it. (On the other hand, the sand on the Gold Coast (Brisbane) and even down here in Victoria (Melbourne) is very nice (fine to very fine particles, though not quite powdery), but your standard pale yellow to yellow-white in color. :-)
 
 

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