Using Quickrete for a basement slab...

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Old 05-06-10, 04:49 AM
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Using Quickrete for a basement slab...

So the plumbing has been roughed in, the gravel base is graded and hand tamped. I have a 6 mil vapor barrier to lay down over the gravel. My wife and I are ready to tackle the 9x10 slab in the basement. We think we can handle it (its easy, right?), but I'm wondering about the different mixes avalible. Now, I was talking to a commerical concrete guy when they were pouring a new dock at work and he said to use the regular quickrete mix, but to toss a shovel load or two of portland cement in with each bag... to "sweeten the mix".

He also talked about 5 or 6 bag mix. He says its a term that describes how much portland is in the mix...

Quickrete also offers crack resistand and 5000psi mix (but this one sets faster, not sure I want that)

Does anyone know anything about the different quickrete mixes? Any more advice on pouring or working the slab? Yes, we are definatly renting a mixer!
 
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Old 05-06-10, 09:00 AM
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Yes, be sure to let your wife lift the 80# bags into the mixer, that way you wont be sore the day after!

The strength of the concrete usually gets affected if you use an additive for purposes such as quick hardening of the concrete. If Quickcrete offers it to be 5,000 psi, it will be 5,000 psi concrete (assuming you will mix it & process it properly).

Even though the slab is probably walkable the next day, I would still wait at least 7 days to work on it (I do not know your time pressure after the pour though). The concrete needs 28 days to cure to get the 5,000 psi. Do not let your concrete decision making be affected by "fast setting" or "quick hardening" labels.

I know quite a few people who religiously add a shovel load of Portland extra for every pre-mixed bag. 1 shovel load is usually roughly around 20 lbs, so for a 92.5# bag you will have 1 Portland for every 5 bags of "regular" pre-mixed concrete.

I hope this helps! Upload some pictures, I'm curious how it's going!

Good Luck
 
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Old 05-06-10, 09:15 AM
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Have you figured the quantity? And how will you be mixing? According to the Quikcrete site thats about 51 bags for a 4" slab. I'd hate to have to hand mix that....

My wife and I did about 100 bags for a poured paver path back in VA...but that was outside and over a 2 day period...and about 16 yrs ago...lol. I was still sore as a dog.
 
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Old 05-06-10, 04:40 PM
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I'm not interested in a fast set at all... We have no pressing scedual to stict to.

I'm leaning towards regular mix with an extra shovel load of portland.

We bought a 2.5 cf mixer from harbor freight. Quickrete says to allow about 1 cf per 80 lb bag... so 2 bags plus a shovel full of portland in each batch. Sound good to you guys?

We figured we need about 105 cf...
 
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Old 05-06-10, 07:20 PM
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For a 9x10 slab (90 sq ft), it would be 29.7 cubic feet, or 1.1 cubic yards. I think quikrete usually yields about 2/3 of a cubic foot per bag.
As to the mixing, are you going to do it in the basement or outside? if in the basement, make sure to use a respirator because as you open the bags and pour them into the mixer, you're going to get a dust cloud. Also make sure to cover anything (furniture, computers, tv's , etc.) you don't want to get covered with dust.
Good luck.
 
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Old 05-11-10, 04:29 PM
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We did it!!

OK, its not as nice as the pros, but it is level within a 1/2".

But I seem to be getting some seepage from the walls above the new slab. We put a drainage pipe and sump in, but is still dry. The floor has a puddle from water seeping down the wall. I know that I should've located the plastic stip that would go in between the new floor and the old wall, to allow water to pass thru in to the drain tiles... but I didn't ..

So I am thinking about drilling a few holes thru the floor (along the wall) and into the gravel below. I think this will allow the water to pass thru... What do you all think?
 
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