Fix or Replace Porch Concrete Slab


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Old 06-14-11, 12:17 AM
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Fix or Replace Porch Concrete Slab

Hello,

I can't seem to get a straight answer on this, so I'm hoping someone here can help me.

My porch is a concrete slab that sits over my cold room.
It sits on a wood frame.
The cold room has about 1 foot of it above ground.

The slab has a crack in one corner.
Moisture also soaks into the top 3 to 4 inches or so of the cold room wall that is just below the slab.

So I'm wondering what to do.
Can I fix this? Or should I hire a contractor to completely replace it?

Here are the options I've been advised on so far:
- Replace the entire slab
- Cap the slab with a 1 inch layer or so of concrete. My uncle (civil engineer) recommended using SikaSeal brand concrete but said I would need to find the right type.
- Contractor suggested completely sealing the slab and any part of the cold room that is above ground with NuCrete.
Added bonus is that they can stamped it to our preferred style.

Below are pictures of the:
- Crack in the slab (2)
- Portion of the cold room that is above ground (2)
- Soaked wood frame below the slab (2)

Thanks for any help anyone can give with this.










 
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Old 06-14-11, 03:15 PM
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I wouldn't replace the entire slab. I think it would crack again. I see a crack in the wall in the cold room which tells me that there is some movement there.

I would just open the crack to about 2" wide & 3" deep & pour new cement in it.
 
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Old 06-15-11, 09:00 AM
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In my opinion it is all about your budget. The slab should be self supporting and the wooden structure is probably what was used to support it all when they poured it. Most builders just leave the wood up to avoid potential issues later, but the pad will support itself. Even with the crack the way it is, structurally it isn't going anywhere, especially with the wood structure under the damaged spot, and remember also that cold rooms are basically moist cold places by design. I think the cracks may have more to do with water/ice damage that settlement cracks. It looks like at some point water entered into the pad from a small crack for example, and eventually ice pulled things further apart. If you want it to look special you could cap it all with a specific cement product, or just open the crack a little more and seal it all up with even something like hydraulic cement which will expand and provide a fairly tight water seal.
 
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Old 06-23-11, 11:47 AM
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Thanks for the replies.

I think I'm just going to get it "sealed" up.

The crack I can handle on my own.
But it's not just the crack. The sides have water coming in as well.

A contractor has offered to seal the top and the sides with NuCrete.
I assume it's this stuff: Stainless Concrete Countertops, Concrete Sinks, Kitchen Countertops, Bath Countertops, See Photos

This will seal it and also be aesthetically pleasing. Added "curb" appeal and home value.

The damage for this though is about $1600.
Any thoughts?
 
 

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