Using Trex for Walkway Framing


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Old 07-04-11, 02:47 PM
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Using Trex for Walkway Framing

I have removed the ugly concrete walkway in the backyard that has been decomposing for years, and am going to use concrete paving blocks and sand for the new walkway. I want to frame it in with a material that will retain the sand and not decompose, or at least not in the next 20 years and am wondering if Trex decking material would work for this being that it will be in contact with the ground.
 
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Old 07-05-11, 05:43 AM
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They make plastic edging specifically for edging pavers. Usually it's in the pavers & patio area of big box home improvement stores. It comes in L or T shapes and is held in place with large nails (plastic or steel) and is almost invisible after the project is finished.

Synthetic decking probably could work for edging but you would need to figure out how to anchor it and because of it's thickness it would be more visible when your project is completed. Oh, and don't forget the cost. It's a rather expensive material to mostly bury.
 
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Old 07-05-11, 06:28 AM
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As Dane said, there are products intended for this purpose so it's hard to recommend something meant for another purpose entirely instead.
 
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Old 07-06-11, 12:13 PM
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Actually, I was planning on leaving the Trex as a boarder and a container to keep the sand in, and was just wondering if it would survive in the ground as apposed to being used on a deck. I know absolutely nothing about walkways. This is a short walkway that is in a place that it is rare for anyone other than the two of us to ever see, so Iím not looking for something real fancy. Rather keep the cost low, and I also live in a rather remote area, and almost anything I do needs to be researched on the internet and special ordered, but the Trex is always in stock, and it seems like a good firm material to hold the sand in. There will not be any curves. Itís a straight shot.
 
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Old 07-06-11, 12:33 PM
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Trex will stand up fine to the weather and ground contact. If you don't mind the cost or the relatively wide exposed edge....go for it. The hard part might be trying to keep it from pushing up or moving around.

Freeze/thaw could be an issue.
 
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Old 07-06-11, 06:55 PM
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Thanks Gunguy. Thatís the info I was looking for. Two 14-foot boards is probably all I need. I havenít priced it, but Iím sure the price is not a factor for the small amount I am thinking of using. As for the thickness, Iím thinking it would make a nice boarder around the plain concrete blocks I plan on using. As for pushing up or moving, are you talking about during installation, or something that might happen later?

Freeze/thaw is not an issue around here.
 
 

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