Pouring Concrete Slab in Existing Garage w/DIRT FLOOR - Cost???

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Old 08-17-11, 11:39 AM
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Pouring Concrete Slab in Existing Garage w/DIRT FLOOR - Cost???

Hello everyone! I've been hunting around trying to wrap my brains around a way to get a floor into my 100 year old garage. Its a 18.5'x18.5' (inside dimension) garage with a dirt floor. There is a fieldstone/mortar "foundation" around the perimeter with 6"x6" beams on top of the perimeter. The bottom of the 6x6's are a little less than 4" above the dirt floor and are level.

I'd really like to have a concrete floor in there without making a humongous project out of it. My plan is to move all of my wood working equipment in there.

So.....it is possible for a concrete person to come in and pour 4-5" of concrete using the existing stone foundation and 6"x6" beams as the forms? Is there anything else aside from the associated rebar that would be involved?

As a side note...I live in central MA, what is the going rate for concrete per yard and finish work? Thanks!
 
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Old 08-17-11, 04:03 PM
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I wouldn't pour concrete against your wood beams. The concrete will take on moisture and transfer it to your wood and rot it out. You should remove enough dirt to give yourself the proper depth for a slab.
 
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Old 08-17-11, 04:53 PM
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My son has a contractor working on his numbers right now, for a 26'x30' garage slab. His is free standing so will need forms. I will post when he gets the quote.

Plan your drainage so water doesn't come in from anywhere and if any gets in, you know where it is going.

Bud
 
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Old 08-18-11, 05:09 AM
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Thank you Bud!!! This is the first time I'm doing a serious concrete project and knowing average market prices would be a huge plus!

And droo....good advice as well. There is an average of 4-6" below the beams for concrete.....so I could just tell them to bring the concrete up to the beam.

So all I would essentially be paying for is 5-7 yards of concrete, and labor for finishing.
 
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Old 08-18-11, 05:53 AM
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Can you easily get a very heavy concrete truck right to where you need it? If there is a garage door, perfect, as the chutes will reach all the way back. The trucks are heavy and can damage a thin asphalt driveway.

They will need to install a form in front where the door is, and possible a pressure treated two by all the way around if they can't work to the existing foundation.

Moisture is always an issue in an unheated garage so be sure you install a good vapor barrier under that concrete. If you plan on heating the garage, then think about some rigid insulation under before the pour. That's adding to the complexity as some dirt might have to come out, but a lot easier now than later. Actually, there is no later .

Shop tools that are stored in unheated spaces are subject to condensation. So even if nothing leaks and the vapor barrier is perfect, everything can still rust. Chandler and others are experienced tool people and perhaps they can comment on your likely hood of having problems.

Bud
 
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Old 08-22-11, 04:41 AM
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All good points Bud! Luckily there is a garage door so access shouldn't be a problem. The garage is about 25 feet from the end of the driveway, so they'll have to park on my lawn for a while. I'm sure this is going to mess the lawn up for a while but I consider it a small price to pay. The asphalt driveway is already a mess so a few more cracks won't bother me

Where the truck will park though is right over the old septic system. I'm connected to the town sewer now and have no need for the old septic, so hopefully this won't be an issue.

Also, once upon a time I started a thread about storing tools in an outside garage..... it was Chandler approved!
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ca...-good-bad.html
 
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Old 08-22-11, 05:26 AM
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Concrete Truck

Where the truck will park though is right over the old septic system. I'm connected to the town sewer now and have no need for the old septic, so hopefully this won't be an issue.
Running over a septic tank with a truck load of concrete will be a huge issue! Keep the truck off the septic tank!
 
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Old 08-22-11, 05:46 AM
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Please excuse the concrete newbieness...but what method will they likely pursue if they park the truck at the end of the driveway? Use wheelbarrows to move the concrete load by load 50ft to the far end of the garage? Or use some super long chute contraption?

 
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Old 08-22-11, 06:07 AM
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IMO, they will not be happy, but they can do it at a price. As Wirepuller said, they won't go near a septic system and I actually doubt they would even go on your lawn. I got one stuck on a job once and it cost half a day, three loads of gravel and a skidder to resolve the problem and that was backing into an area they approved. Your contractor can tell you what is best. They can chute it about 20' max, but if you have to wheel it they will take it right at the truck.

There are concrete buggies that can move it faster, but that would be up to the contractor, if he has one.

Bud
 
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Old 08-22-11, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by BigOldXJ View Post
Please excuse the concrete newbieness...but what method will they likely pursue if they park the truck at the end of the driveway? Use wheelbarrows to move the concrete load by load 50ft to the far end of the garage? Or use some super long chute contraption?

They will most likely use a concrete pump. That will add a few hundred dollars to the cost of the project. Ask your ready mix supplier(s) if they have their own pump or will have to subcontract that. They should also be able to tell you what it will cost.
 
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