Concrete threshold

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  #1  
Old 08-22-11, 01:46 PM
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Concrete threshold

I have an exterior door going from my basement to a stairwell outside (both floors in/out are at the same height). My concrete threshold is lower than I wanted (currently 1 inch high) and I am worried about water and or snow coming in at the bottom off the door. I have extra room at the top and would like to add an inch to the concrete threshold that the door sits on. Can I just pour 1 inch of concrete on top off the existing concrete threshold? or am I stuck just putting lumber under the door etc?

My #1 concern is that it is watertight.

Thanks,
 
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Old 08-22-11, 05:56 PM
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An inch of concrete won't hold. There are rubber seals available. Look for one of those.
 
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Old 08-22-11, 06:30 PM
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How about the floor levelling cement? That is routinely put down thin?

Can't seem to find these rubber seals Pulpo... except on the door. I need something that will raise the entire door assembly - something under the threshold that is water tight.
 
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Old 08-23-11, 05:38 AM
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I'm not a mason but I'd think if you painted the old concrete with a bonding agent, the new concrete would adhere fine. 25 years or so ago I had to fix the floor in my old shop and the edges were finished down to almost nothing. I don't remember the name of the bonding agent but the repairs still looked good 5 yrs later when I moved.
 
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Old 08-23-11, 08:02 AM
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I don't understand why you would have to raise the door. Try the bonding agent that marksr suggested. You might get lucky.
 
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Old 08-23-11, 10:03 AM
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When they originally cut the hole in the concrete for the door, they cut it a little too low. The threshold should be a few inches above the outside grade to keep the weather off the door, they cut it only an inch up. Since there was extra room at the top, I was going to raise the threshold up an inch or so then put the door back in.

So I was thinking either cement (which would be best) or some lumber under the door to prop it up. Waterproofing is my #1 concern...
 
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Old 08-23-11, 05:33 PM
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I did a job for a woman who had a water entering from under the door. The threshold was at the proper height but the drain outside could handle the water. I install a 60 gallon dry well outside the door & I haven't heard of any problems since. What about that idea?
 
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Old 08-23-11, 10:11 PM
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I haven't had any water issues yet - I am just installing the door. I figured if I could raise the threshold an inch or 2 before I start I would ahead of the game....
 
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Old 08-23-11, 11:16 PM
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Now I understand. I was under the impression that the door was installed & you wanted to modify it. Clamp 2 pieces of wood to the current threshold at the height where you want it. 2" above the current height would be good. Mix some portland cement with sand, 3 sand to 1 portland & fill the gap.
 
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Old 08-23-11, 11:32 PM
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would just the premix concrete work?
 
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Old 08-24-11, 07:06 AM
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My second choice would be a Type N mortar mix. A concrete mix has stones in it. I wouldn't care if it were a footing.
 
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Old 09-11-11, 10:13 PM
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@Pulpo, I am about to do something similar. Is type N mortar mix strong enough for a threshold? I will be installing a pre-hung door, so the small amount of wood along the bottom is all that will protect the cement from direct traffic. Odds are the cement may not be visible by the time we're done, so at that point does it matter if I use the Quikrete with the stones? Also, is there an ideal mix-to-water ratio I should use?

If I opt to get the Portland Cement and sand mixture, can I use that other places, such as to fix the chips in some other concrete? Is there an ideal amount of water to add to this mix?

@C-COOP - which method did you use and how did it come out?

Thanks!
 
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Old 10-03-11, 03:36 PM
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I used a premix of portland cement and sand. Went down great and was really easy to form and strip after. One problem I had were a couple cracks on the top that started while drying. Maybe I didn't keep it wet enough while it was curing?? Either way I filled in the cracks with hydraulic cement and moved on. Looks fine to me.
 
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Old 10-04-11, 10:29 AM
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Get some pre-mix bags of sand topping mix. It's concrete without the rock and meant for thin applications. Coat your existing pad with some concrete bond and then add the new mix on top of the old pad. Finish with a hand float and broom the surface when it's hard enough. Good luck.
 
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Old 10-12-11, 05:59 PM
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I'm just a DIY guy, but If you need to build it up an inch, why not place the door on a non-rot material like the Azek 5/4" boards? I'd think if you use some caulk on the surfaces touching concrete, then use concrete screws to hold it in place then you'd have a pretty tight seal. After you place the door, if you press a bead of caulk on the exterior into the corners of the concrete and the Azek board then you should be pretty good. Just check it out every couple years and replace that outer bead if you need to.

Exterior Door & Window Trim | Exterior House Trim | AZEK Trim

Edit: Just saw this thread is ancient. -__-
 
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Old 10-12-11, 06:59 PM
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excellent idea, Shift. I've done the same thing many times.
 
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