How long before I can turn on the heat after chimney patch?


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Old 12-15-11, 03:29 PM
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How long before I can turn on the heat after chimney patch?

Hey all,

Today I removed a metal plug from the chimney in the dining room area in the old house I am living in and patched the hole with brick and mortar. Used some great tips I found on this site and it seems to have turned out great so far. I forgot one tiny detail though... when I can turn my heat back on safely?

I don't want to damage the strength of the mortar or the patch in general, but it's also winter time... Fortunately we're in a bit of a warm spell at the moment around here and I could possibly leave the heat off for a few days, but probably no more than a week and even that is not preferable.

The house does not have a fireplace, the chimney is venting a gas powered boiler for the house water radiator system and probably the gas hot water tank as well. The patch is one floor up from the boiler and water heater. Is it even something I need to worry about? If so what is the minimum I should wait and still expect the patch job to be OK? I know in these cases it seldom matters, but I have never felt the chimney "wall" get even warm (the chimney runs up through several rooms in the house).

Also, we want to plaster over the patch and then paint to match the rest of the chimney and the wall it's in. How long should I wait before I plaster over the patch and paint? Also would all purpose joint compound be more desirable to cover the patch for painting, or plaster? I am able to do either. Our old house has plaster over all the walls, but it's a plaster veneer not a full wooden lathe. Thanks in advance for the info!
 
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Old 12-16-11, 11:42 AM
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Just wondering...do the boiler and WH just vent to the chimney or do they have metal ducts that lead up to the top?

If metal...then go ahead and fire stuff up. Even if they aren't I doubt you need to worry. Mortar and similar materials cure within about 24 hrs. They continue to harden over a few days but not like concrete that gets stronger over months.
 
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Old 12-16-11, 02:01 PM
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I hope the gas appliance and furnace vent to a stainless tube and not just to a masonry chimney. Flue liners and bricks are not very good hosts to the gas vented appliances. It's because water is byproduct of the exhaust of these items and the constant condensation of gas vapor will work into a flue liner and deteriorate the chimney from the inside out.

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Old 12-16-11, 02:54 PM
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Thanks for the info guys, that's what I was hoping to hear. Yeah, they both do vent with metal piping into an old brick chimney. The metal piping leads out of the top of the units and comes into the chimney at a slight angle. I noticed when I pulled that metal plug out of the chimeny that there is some kind of smoother long ceramic looking bricks on the inside as well, where the stove that was there a long time ago vented to. I can't see into the chimney all the way down into the basement but I am guessing this is for some kind of heat resistance or to direct the exhaust better? Either way it looks like I am safe there.

For the other part of the question, do you guys have a recommendation which is better to apply to the interior wall of the house for finishing? Should I coat the patched area with plaster or all purpose joint compound? I don't want it to start cracking through the paint again like it did when then metal plug was there. I have plaster mix, pre-mixed all purpose joint compound and powder 90min all purpose compound that I can mix myself. I'm comfortable with any of them, just want to use whichever is most likely to make a nice durable coating to paint over... if it matters one over the others?

Thanks guys! really appreciate the peace of mind!
 
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Old 12-16-11, 05:56 PM
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I'm thinking that the premixed joint compound would be my last choice of the three mentioned, The 90 minute stuff is a lot tuffer for this application than pre mixed joint compount. I think i would opt for a piece of steel lath stapled over the patched area with good old plaster coat over that. It's all up to the guy with a trowel in his hand.

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Old 12-16-11, 09:09 PM
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Thanks for the advice! I can do plaster no problem!

Quick question about the steel lath though. If I use metal wouldn't it eventually do the same thing that the metal plug did?

The reason we had to remove the plug is because over the years it had rusted I guess and the moisture difference or some such was leeching through the paint... I could be getting confused but it was something like that I was told as to why it happened. It was extremely noticeable with the paint chipping and cracking to pieces in a distinct circle around the circumference of the plug.

I have no problem with adding the steel lath, sounds like it would definitely add some extra support, I just want to make sure I won't end up in a similar situation a few years from now with the paint. Appreciate the insight!
 
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Old 12-17-11, 04:48 AM
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will that plug yoiu are covering be depressed or will the patch be set back from surface so when done it will be flush?

I would think you could get your lath in galvanized to resist rust in stead of that old blued stuff that is prone to rust. Maybe you will have to hang a dish or picture over the patch.

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Old 12-18-11, 01:23 PM
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Thanks for the info bullshooter, it's slightly recessed now, I did it on purpose because I knew it would need to have a decent coat of plaster or something over it to sit flush with the rest of the wall for painting. I'm no expert by any means, but my other adventures in this old house have taught me that getting flush with plaster or joint is a lot easier if you have a recessed area to skim up to rather than trying to blend a crack or seam between two even surfaces.

I'll see what I can find locally, galvanized etc to see if I can find a rust proof option. We're going for somewhat minimalist decoration in that room, one big painting on the largest wall and there is a china cabinet set into the wall opposite that as well. That is all we had planned to do for decoration in there, no dishes or small pictures hanging around if we can help it.

I'll see what I can get my hands on though. Thanks for the tips and advice guys! Really appreciate your time!
 
 

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