Cutting Pavers with Circular Saw

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  #1  
Old 01-06-12, 11:10 AM
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Cutting Pavers with Circular Saw

I am a homeowner who has some 12x12 pavers that are about 1.5 inches or so thick. I would like to trim some of them so I can fit them into odd places. Like cut them in half for instance, so I can fill a 30x30-inch area.

I have a couple of 7.5-inch circular saws.

What would be a decent brand and p/n blade (s?) to look for?
 

Last edited by Pipsisiwah; 01-06-12 at 11:12 AM. Reason: more info
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  #2  
Old 01-06-12, 11:29 AM
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You need clean cuts for installing pavers and I doubt that your Skil saws can pass muster even if youi put a diamond blade inside. For consistent accurate cuts you really would be better off to use a power saw for cutting concrete floors and they generally require a 12 or 14" diamond blade. You can usually rent them and they usually charge acccording to a wear measurement for the blade. Another option could be a mason's table saw designed for cutting bricks and blocks or tile liners. Their are hydraulic shears available for rental for pavers but I have never used one so I can't vouch for their effectiveness or lack there of.

Neatness counts for paver work and those pavers cost too much to butcher them with a sub par cut.

bs5
 
  #3  
Old 01-06-12, 11:46 AM
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The first thing that comes to mind with using a circular saw to cut pavers is how are you going to hold onto them?
Without a firm grip I could see binding and grabbing.

I've seen installers use a flat mason's chisel to cut them but not sure if that requires a lot of bad cuts while learning how.
Perhaps you could rent the proper saw.
 
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Old 01-06-12, 01:01 PM
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I wonder if using a masonry blade and just cutting a 1/4" or so deep and then using a mason's chisel and hammer to complete the cut would work?
 
  #5  
Old 01-07-12, 10:30 AM
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Thanks for the replies, guys.

Yeah, I was wondering about that too. How in the heck would I secure a stepping stone when literally all of it will be under the saw motor. (I need a "scratching my head" smilie here!) I might try making a C-shaped jig using some 2x6s, and/or I could use the groove and chisel method like MARKSR suggested.

I do have a 3-inch wide masonry chisel and a decent hammer that I used to baptize the end of my thumb 35 years ago...

I only have a few of these "leftover" spots to fill now and where the rough cut would fit would not be in a particularly visible location. And to prevent this problem in the future I'll just plan my layout to be in even multiples of uncut stone sizes.

That's to simple a solution though, I'll have to figger out how I can make it more complicated!
 
  #6  
Old 01-08-12, 01:32 PM
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Cutting Pavers

I have cut 12" x12" pavers with a circular saw equipped with a masonry blade. Keep in mind that pavers are not as hard as concrete. A jig with a slot in the bottom for the saw blade would be best to hold the paver. I laid mine on top of a low brick wall (a rough surface) and had no problems. Cut slowly without "crowding" the saw. The dust is really tough on saw bearings. Good luck with your project.
 
  #7  
Old 01-08-12, 02:15 PM
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Your suggestion to use a simple pattern is a good one. Especially if you are limited to 7 1/4 saws. The problem for these types of tools is that the dust created with the likes of a small saw used to cut pavers can be very abrasive and would contribute to early failure. If you are going to do it I would advise again to make sure youi get a 7"diamond abrasive for abouit $25 as opposed to those worthless gray masonry blades.

If you are going to try and get fancy with your paver pattern and use curves and circles you will certainly have a more dificult time with small hand saws in that for it to look finished and neat you will most likely need some small but accurate slivers to fill in asi the curved pattern meets conventional. Those typed of cuts are best made with masonry table or power saws with diamond blades and roller tables to accomodate the paver fit. Have fun.

I have never used a sabre type saw to cut a paver. It seems to me that would be time consuming at the very least but if it works for you.....more power to you.


bs5
 
  #8  
Old 01-08-12, 03:18 PM
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If the "pavers" are 12"x12" and 1 1/2" thick, they are not real pavers made to paver standards and are just "stepping stones". They will typically be softer/weaker than a paver that is 8000 psi compressive strength and cuts much easier as mentioned by and earlier poster.

Is the 30"x30" area the size of the area to be filled or is it a module of the pattern to be used in a larger patio?

Dick
 
  #9  
Old 01-08-12, 09:18 PM
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Score front and back edges at least 3/8" deep with your saw, then a shallower cut across the top and bottom connecting the edge cuts. Follow that with some serious taps with a 3-lb. maul on your brick set, and they will break apart just like downtown. If necessary, some final "tune-up" trimming on any lumps with a mason's hammer will make things prettier.
 
  #10  
Old 01-09-12, 03:32 PM
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Thanks guys for the help. I think I'll give it a try tomorrow. Here is an example of the types of gaps I need to fill using the 12x12 stepping stones (the dirt between the deck and the 2x4):

 
  #11  
Old 01-09-12, 06:02 PM
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It looks like you are using what we would call a patio stone and not actual pavers. you should be able to trim thos with a wide brickset. When you start cutting those units, make sure you have some sand benath for even support or you might get some unintended cracks.

bs5
 
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