Foundation problem? Pic inside.


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Old 01-10-12, 01:43 PM
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Foundation problem? Pic inside.

This happened a few months back. I see boards in the attic above it are slightly angled. Thanks for any advice.

 
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Old 01-10-12, 02:32 PM
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I'm lost as to what your question is. Are you talking about that crack in the ceiling and you suspect foundation problem? Tell us more and how about some pictures of the foundation and what lead you to suspect the trouble with the foundation.

I guess right now I have more questions than answers. The ball is still in your court.

bs5
 
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Old 01-10-12, 02:38 PM
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That is pretty much the question I guess... Is this a foundation problem? I found more cracks in other areas. I noticed the back door seems harder to shut and lock.. I had to grind away some at the lock area or I had to lift up real hard on the door to lock it. From what I understand foundation repairs are real expensive. I assume insurance does not help with this? Not sure what to do at this point.
 
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Old 01-10-12, 03:54 PM
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Well, it may well be the foundation but it should be checked over oan the problem pinpointed. How old is the house? What type of foundation does it have? Does it have a basement or crawl space? What is the foundation made of? Blocks or poured concrete or perhaps wood? Can you check the thickness & width of the footing? What type of soil do you have if yoiu know? Have you checked the foundation for level. There are many ways to do that. A lasar level could be used by setting it on a corner and space it out perhaps a 1 1/2" Then you could check the wall for ny deviation by mesuring in along your lasar line. If it is new perhaps some pictures and figures would be invaluble .

I am sure you will get some input but please elaborate so an informed observation can be made.

bs5
 
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Old 01-10-12, 05:33 PM
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I suspect your sill plates and maybe even the ends of the floor joists have rotted or been destroyed by termites. Same look and symptoms (doors sticking, drywall cracks, etc.) as my sister's house. There was nothing wrong with her foundation.
I jacked the house up, sistered new joists, and installed new sill plates there to correct the problem. A lot of work.
If you're not sure what you're looking at, have a contractor come out to diagnose it and give you an estimate spelling out what he intends to do. That way, you'll at least know for sure what's wrong and the measures needed to correct it.
 
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Old 01-12-12, 08:36 AM
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I guess its possible but I had the house checked for termites a while back. I should mention my bathroom vinyl tiles started popping up and there is a crack running under them in the cement. I was told suface cracks are normal but I am starting to suspect this is not.
 
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Old 01-12-12, 08:39 AM
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Bullshooter5, The house was built in 1994 and is about 1,800sqft. The foundation is poured concrete and the soil I have no idea. I am In houston texas if that helps any. There is no basement or crawlspace.
 
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Old 01-12-12, 10:15 AM
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Thanks for the extra information. So, are you talking about the house is on a slab. I take it that is what you mean because you say there is no crawl space or basement. If that is so it sounds like you are on top of a slab or poured floor. If that is so that eliminates the possibility of rotted floor joists. If the house is on a slab I spose you could have termite damage or rot in the bottom wall plates.

I think if your house is built on a poured floor and the floor does not show obvious settling or cracking you are going to have to check the floor plates by removing a baseboard and digging through the drywall in a suspected area. You should also see if you have a seperate footing or stem wall around the perimeter that might have some depth to it a poured floor might not.

Perhaps you should have an experienced contractor take a look. I doubt he would charge as you are still trying to come up with a cause.

Good Luck and please keep us advised of your findings.

Thank you

bs5
 
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Old 01-12-12, 03:58 PM
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Is it possible that your soil has been very dry for an extended period of time (I am talking several months). I know there have been some drought issues in Texas and it is possible that your soil can actually lose enough of it's typical moisture content to allow for compaction beyond anything in the past. This can happen years after the concrete was poured in some instances. I believe they refer to it as desication (sp?) of the soil or something similar. Not likely I know but something to consider.
 
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Old 01-13-12, 05:38 AM
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> (spiper)
=============

Clay soils in dry climates can expand and contract with humidity extremes. The only way to combat that is by keeping the moisture content controlled with regular watering of the lawn and soils close to a foundation.

bs5
 
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Old 01-13-12, 10:30 AM
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Lightbulb

Found this, seems they have some weird clay in Texas.


I think they have improved things alot recently with house pads in Texas, as now all use a pre-tenstioned cable system for one thing to help support some limited and expected movement. Texas is a little unique in some regards also. Texas clay is nothing like what is seen up in the Northern States and Canada and that is why they don't routinely dig out basements. It often resembles concrete more than anything else and makes digging almost impossible at times, and when it moves, it can litterly move walls, not only lift and lower a pad.
 
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Old 01-19-12, 07:16 AM
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Major drought down here. Anyone who didnt water their foundations this summer is subject to having foundation issues. Last i heard the Houston area was around 16" below normal annual rainfall amounts.
 
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Old 01-24-12, 03:40 PM
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Looking at the windows.. walls. and doors of my house makes me really think its a foundation problem. I plan on doing a soaker hose setup fairly soon. I have called two companies for free estimates but I also plan on getting a structual Engineer to go over things. Someone who isn't trying to sell me foundation repair. If anyone knows a good Foundation company in the Houston,Texas area please let me know.
 
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Old 01-25-12, 03:23 PM
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Fortunately for the folks in the Upper Midwest, we are not encountering those problems but I just happen to have a friend in Spring, Tex. I understand Spring is just South of Houston. I know you are getting a real good much needed rain storm today. That helps but I realize that it is too late to reverse the structural damage you seem to encountered. He has actually consulted a Foundation Company that has a system for tending to damage from the parched clay out there. Here is a link to their website:

Du-West Foundation Repair - Full Service House Leveling, Under Slab Plumbing, and Home and Commercial Foundation Repair in Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, Corpus Christi, Austin, Victoria, and surrounding areas

He told me they have a system for keeping the soil near the foundation well watered but quite frankly his solution has always been to maintain moisture content next to house with a soaker hose surrounding the structure.

a few years back he did however hire the company to do some pier work to rectify some issues similar to yours. You are on the right track to consult a contractor that specializes in this process.

bs5
 

Last edited by bullshooter5; 01-25-12 at 03:43 PM.
 

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