Concrete in backyard


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Old 03-12-12, 01:06 PM
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Question Concrete in backyard

Hi there,

Just bought a house, and backyard is filled with dirt but with grading set already.

Looking to pour concrete in the backyard, but have several concerns.

It's about 600sq/ft, the person is asking for $3000 to do the job.

I asked for wire mesh, but he said glass fiber is better, so that's what he would use. He also going to do 2 drainage, since the only drainage is on the side. He also going to do red brick outlining for me. I am in CA, so I am not sure if this is a good price, is there anything else I need to look out for ? or ask him ?

Beside concrete, what else I could do with my backyard that's similar priced or lower, because I heard if I put mostly concrete in the back, it absorbed heat and my house would be hotter??

Thank you!
 
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Old 03-12-12, 01:25 PM
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The price doesn't sound that bad...if my calcs are right thats about 12 sq yds of concrete. I'm sure the Pro's will advise with more details to look for.

The house won't be really hotter...but concrete isn't as good as grass and soil at making it feel cooler in the area around it.
 
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Old 03-12-12, 07:37 PM
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I did not want that much of maintainability hence the concrete. The price doesn't sound that bad, but not that good as well, for 600sq/ft, it's like $50 per sq/ft.
 
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Old 03-13-12, 03:32 AM
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It figures about 7.3 cubic yards of concrete at 4 inches thick. The price doesn't sound bad to me either. I assume the contractor will have to move the concrete into the backyard by some means other than driving the mixer truck into your backyard. This may include a bobcat, georgia buggy, pump, wheelbarrows, etc. If he could pour all of it directly from the truck, that's another story. The brick edging is probably adding quite a bit of cost too. If he's using real brick it's a LOT of extra work.
Light colored concrete will reflect more sunlight than dark colored pavers will, so the concrete would actually be a bit cooler. Grass would be cooler yet.
If you think $3,000 is too high, get more estimates and compare. Just make sure you're comparing apples to apples such as the quality of the work, contractor's insurance, timeframe for completion, etc.
 
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Old 03-13-12, 08:58 PM
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Okay, yea he's going to get a concrete truck and pour it from the other side of the wall, since behind my backyard is actually a parking lot.

In term of using glass fiber inside the concrete ? any thought on that ? what about adding color to the concrete ?

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-14-12, 03:16 AM
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Fiber mixed into concrete solves the potential problem of wire mesh lying on the bottom of the slab where it does no good. I use fiber in all concrete I pour. However, I also use rebar to keep the slabs on the same plane once they crack, so one side doesn't settle more than the other. Fiber alone won't do that.
Color can make concrete look nicer, but can only darken it (unless you use white cement with a very light pigment, but you're talking a LOT more money). Darker concrete is hotter than light concrete. If you're concerned about heat, go with the lightest color you can.
I know the cost of living in California is a lot higher than here in the midwest, so the price you got still doesn't seem outrageous to me, poured directly from the truck or not.
 
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Old 04-16-12, 08:46 PM
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sorry. But for backyard, is 2" depth okay or I need 4" ? Thanks !
 
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Old 04-17-12, 02:23 AM
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4 inches for sure. And re-reading your earlier posts your math is wrong. $3000 for 600 square feet is only $5 per square foot...not $50. A steal anywhere, and I would think especially so in California.
 
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Old 04-17-12, 10:27 AM
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2"

Ah.. you are right. it's $5 per square ft. But I guess the reason why it's only $3000 because he said he is only going to pour 2" because he think it's backyard and there is no need for 4" or rebar

should I run away now ?
 
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Old 04-17-12, 10:51 AM
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Sidewalks are 4", why would a patio be able to only be half that?
 
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Old 04-17-12, 10:52 AM
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Yes.........thats not good....and I'm no concrete expert. Maybe just MAYBE...you could do 3"...but I wouldn't.

As was said...anything that big will eventually crack and heave....w/o rebar you could wind up with differences in height where it cracks. And I don't mean 5-10 yrs later....more like 2. Then you'll be paying someone else even more to remove all the bad stuff and do it right.
 
 

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