Can this Retaining Wall Be Repaired?

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Old 03-26-12, 11:51 AM
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Can this Retaining Wall Be Repaired?

Looking for advice on what to do about this retaining wall. It's cemented into my driveway (done by previous owner) so replacing is not an easy or cheap project. Any good repair options? I think it's gotten worse in the 12 months I've owned the house and I don't want the whole thing to collapse down.

Thanks in advance

http://img826.imageshack.us/img826/1...0326121940.jpg
http://img818.imageshack.us/img818/1...0326121857.jpg
http://img829.imageshack.us/img829/7...0326121846.jpg
 
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Old 03-26-12, 03:46 PM
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Is the poured wall leaning as bad as it appears?

You might be able to pry or jack up the 'bricks' and insert some support below so it won't look so bad.
 
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Old 03-26-12, 08:51 PM
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No that's just an optical allusion of the picture. The poured wall is very straight.
 
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Old 03-27-12, 09:58 AM
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The base or foundation under the block walls has failed or was installed improperly.

It appears that the split face concrete block are either Allan Block or a "knock-off" unit. Allan has a built in set-back at every course for increased strength. The units have it also. Allan Block and all other SRW block walls are meant to be "flexible" and are always built on a compacted base and a concrete footing is not recommended and voids guarantees because the loss of ability to move with the weather and soil and the use of mortar also violates the recommended installation instructions for a SRW wall.

It looks like the compacted base under the pure SRW block wall was not properly compacted and settled differently than the older established wall, which is a rigid wall and rigid and flexible walls are not compatible. High retaining walls up to 40' high can be built using flexible SRW walls.

The optical illusion is created because of the comparison of the vertical poured wall with the battered SRW wall.

Dick
 
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Old 03-27-12, 10:15 AM
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Dick, you meant 40" not 40' - right?
 
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Old 03-27-12, 11:23 AM
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I've seen Dick post this info before, I'm sure he means 40'
 
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Old 03-27-12, 12:04 PM
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The 40' is the highest I have seen. - As all walls above 5' are, it was engineered. Below 5', they do not not need geogrid or engineering except for some local requirements and the max may be 3' or 4', depending on the quaintness of the local area. In our area, the county routinely builds similar short walls with no engineering or grid and just uses standard "plates" for instructions.

The tall wall was one section of along wall installation that was adjacent to a freeway that varied in heights with most sections between 1' and 25' high and wall had both inside and outside curves and no concrete footing.

Dick
 
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Old 03-27-12, 12:08 PM
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Yeah...he wasn't talking about buying the things at HD and making flowerbeds....

Interesting info here...http://geosyntheticproducts.com/asse...cs.roanoke.pdf
 
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Old 03-27-12, 04:44 PM
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Yes I agree that it was not installed correctly. I'm guessing they didn't put much of a base underneath the section that collapsed. The quesiton I have now is will there be a risk that more of the wall will collapse in and should I try to get it repaired (and can it even be repaired).
 
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Old 03-28-12, 09:00 AM
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Risk of more collapsing? Yes.

Repair this? Yes.
 
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Old 03-28-12, 10:54 AM
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Any idea how to make the repairs?
 
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Old 03-28-12, 04:15 PM
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It won't be easy, if your lucky you can raise up the 'blocks' that settled and then insert something under them to hold them up. I assume the correct way to fix it would be to tear it down and do it over
 
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Old 03-28-12, 08:57 PM
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I was afraid of that. That seems kind of risky though, I'm afraid I might make it worse. I'm wondering if I can at least stabilize it by leaving the fallen blocks where they are and trying to fill the gaps in some way so at least the blocks above have some support. What you think?
 
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Old 03-28-12, 09:48 PM
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If it were mine, this would be a TOC (Thrive On Challenge) DIY project. Finished in a few weeks, max.

In summary, the work would involve lifting each settled section using a high-lift jack (sometimes called a farmer's jack), and temporarily holding the sections in place using short lengths of horizontal stout steel angle and removable vertical brackets. At the very bottom, more steel angle segments would be needed, propped into excavated pockets under bottom course blocks using small sacrificial blocks or rocks, working a few feet at a time. Then a new 6" thick concrete footing under everything to hold things in place. Upper courses of angle can be removed with a gorilla bar after footing has developed strength.

While the foregoing may not be up to Allan Block standards, it will work. The concrete driveway topping already in place is the key, tying the upper courses in place and preventing differential forces from working on things.

Just for kicks, get a few quotes for doing the repair from specialty contractors. I'm guessing nothing will come in under $2000, while the DIY option can be done for a few hundred $$$ in temporary materials, plus the cost of concrete.
 
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Old 04-21-12, 04:49 PM
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Hi
I got a problem with my retaining wall leaning over, the soil hasn't move but wall came away after heavy rain. It has poor drainage and i'm sure my palm tree roots has helped pushed away.
I was thinking I could prop wall back up into place then drill holes down verticley from the top to the bottom and further into the cement footing and reinforce with new steel.
the wall is 30 odd years old 1m high and 30m long.

thoughts anyone???
 
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Old 04-23-12, 01:02 AM
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Should you be fortunate enough to properly anchor vertical rebar into the wall's footing (not an easy task, unless you have direct access to the footing), vertical steel won't do much to prevent future leaning of the wall. Far better to excavate and retrofit the poorly-performing footing (if there is one) with something having a larger footprint.
 
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Old 04-23-12, 05:11 AM
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Can you show us a picture of the wall? More than likely, it will need to be replaced.
 
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Old 04-25-12, 06:17 PM
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I've got my own thread with pics on there(took me a while to figure out how to use website)
every thought and comment would help
 
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