How slow can I go pouring concrete?


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Old 04-04-12, 01:50 PM
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How slow can I go pouring concrete?

One section of my concrete driveway, which sits on sand (central florida), was undercut with water on the side, broke at the expansion joint, and "collapsed". The homeowner's association is getting on my case and I need to replace a 10'x10 section of driveway.

I have gotten a few quotes to have it done but I'm also pondering the possibility of doing it myself. The concrete, delivered via mixer, would run 550-600 (according to one of the guys quoting it).

I think this would take a bit more than 50, 80lb bags of concrete. If I rented a mixer and put in a marathon session to pour this myself, would it be okay to start in the morning and plug through the day to get it poured? Or even split it up into two days? I do have some experience with concrete but on smaller projects or with a larger crew in a "contractor" setting. I'm just concerned that if it takes me too long that it would compromise the integrity of the final product.
 
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Old 04-04-12, 02:47 PM
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I've seen a lot of driveways concreted like that in Central America. Even with a couple guys working it's hard to mix and pour fast enough without having it show in the final product. Part of the problem is the concrete is not all from the same batch. Every batch you mix is probably going to look slightly different.
 
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Old 04-04-12, 03:03 PM
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Do you think it is mostly an aesthetic thing? I might be able to live with a third world looking driveway if it lasts.
 
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Old 04-04-12, 03:25 PM
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How's the HOA feel about aesthetics?

The driveway thing must be contagious; I'm having to do some spot repairs on mine a little further south. Nothing as big as 10x10, though. Already did a small corner - about 4 bags - and I have one other section about 3x5. Hand mixed the small job, but going to rent a mixer for the 3x5. Don't think I would attempt to DIY a 10x10.
 
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Old 04-04-12, 03:50 PM
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Call a concrete supplier yourself....that sounds kinda high for that amount (only a bit less than a cubic yard I think). There's a delivery charge for less than certain quantities of course. But unless things have really changed...I would think a redimix truck would only be about $300.

I've mixed 80-90 60lb bags before....and would never do it again, not that I think I could anymore. I could barely lift my arms above my shoulders the next day. And that was for a paver walkway where a slight mismatch didn't matter.

You might check into the mix on site trucks for small jobs, or what I've seen mentioned here...a carrier that you can tow home?
 
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Old 04-04-12, 07:40 PM
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I'll call around and see what my options are. I think this point I'm talked out of doing the bag-at-a-time approach.
 
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Old 04-04-12, 11:25 PM
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Provided you had enough (skilled) help, you could mix it by bags in a hand mixer, but it would still be a long day. A total of 4 guys minimum--1 batching, 1 wheelbarrowing, 1 consolidating/striking off and 1 finishing/striking off. If you'd break it into 5' x 5' squares, you could possibly do it yourself, and take a few days, but still would be work.

I prefer readymix myself. Just watch the stuff run down the chute and write a check. Could be placed and finished by 1 person, but still a long day. For your 1.5 C.Y. pour, anything more than $350 (total) is robbery. As others have said, shop around. Maybe you can avoid the small load charge by having some more stuff (driveway widening strips, sidewalk corner-cutters, etc.) formed up to pour at the same time.

About the worst thing you could do is to have inexperienced friends helping, as you will be spending more time trying to keep them from doing damage and hurting themselves than you will dealing with the wet mud. Been there, done that. Nope, thanx.
 
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Old 04-05-12, 07:32 PM
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First, I agree with getting a short load from the ready mix plant!

I know tube footings are not the same as a slab, but me and another guy mixed 60 bags in about 2.5 hrs. Just find how much water you need and mark it on a bucket. I did 3 bags at a time.
1) add water to mixer
2) add bags to mixer
3) fill bucket to mark for next load while mixing
4) pour mix out.
5) repeat.
 
 

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