Sealing a brick driveway


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Old 05-04-12, 09:08 PM
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Sealing a brick driveway

I just tour down a chimney and what was once the original back of a row house, but after 50 years of additions was now in the middle of the house. So now I have thousands of 100 year old bricks. I was going to use a good chunk of these as a driveway. Most of the bricks are of a hard variety, and look like they will make good pavers. These bricks are going to be sitting on top of a concrete dust base and surrounded by sand on the sides to keep them from rocking around. I was thinking of putting a water sealer on the exposed surface, like a Thompson Water Seal. Someone else suggested using polyurethane( I just happen to have a 5 gal container around).

Are any of these a really bad idea? Is there a standard sealing product for old bricks? Do I have to seal them at all?
 
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Old 05-05-12, 05:15 AM
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I wouldn't use any sealer. The bricks need to breathe.
 
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Old 05-05-12, 03:57 PM
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I wouldn't use poly! it won't weather well.

I've heard that the water base version of Thompson's Water Seal is better for brick because it is somewhat breathable...... don't know how well it will hold up though.
 
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Old 05-05-12, 04:36 PM
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I would not use ANY film-forming sealer. Look for a product such as BASF Enviroseal 40 which is a penetrating, silane sealer. It isn't a coating, and won't change the appearance of the bricks at all, but it will repel water. It allows vapor transmission and so is breathable. Penetrating sealers like this are the best thing for bricks...and concrete for that matter. Google it.
You won't find it in a big box store. Look at a real contractor's supply store.

Good luck!
 
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Old 05-05-12, 04:56 PM
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Thanks for the input guys.
 
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Old 05-06-12, 12:41 PM
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Are the bricks solid, or do they have holes in the center (for mortar to grab onto)? Because of vehicle wheel load forces, there may be a durability problem if holes are present, regardless of which way the bricks are oriented.
 
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Old 05-08-12, 04:22 PM
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They are solid and hard as heck. About 20 % of them are what the demo guy called "salmon" They are softer and orange looking and I was not going to use them.
 
 

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