sealing foundation


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Old 06-06-12, 10:47 PM
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sealing foundation

I have recently dug up and exposed part of my foundation to inspect a few things. I found that there is no sealer or coating of any kind currently in place. What would be a good product to use for this purpose?

The house is slab on grade with poured footings. There appears to be a seam where the footing and slab were poured separately. There are no moisture issues or any other problems with the foundation at this time.

I am also looking to insulate the foundation if possible. I understand foam is the typical product to use, but here in Georgia is against code to use foam below grade. Are there any other products that are used to insulate foundations below grade?
 
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Old 06-08-12, 10:47 AM
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There is a membrane the comes on a roll with some glue. We called the glue La Leche because it looked like milk. You dry the foundation, with a torch, then spray the glue on it & apply the membrane. Some tar can be used around the edges.
 
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Old 06-08-12, 11:59 PM
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Do you know a brand name of this membrane? Does it have any insulating properties to the foundation? Without being able to use any foam below grade it seems that there is not much I can use that has any insulating properties.
 
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Old 06-09-12, 03:44 AM
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Why do you think you need more insulation below grade? The ground itself does a decent job of insulating.
 
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Old 06-09-12, 06:16 AM
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I don't remember the name of the membrane but it's made to install below grade. As marksr said, you won't need any other insulation.
 
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Old 06-09-12, 10:47 PM
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Since I already have it dug up I figured it wouldnt hurt to do it while it is easy to get to. At first I thought I would use XPS, but after doing some research I found out that is against code in Georgia. At this point I am just grabbing at low hanging fruit. By the looks of things I will probably be using a sealer of some sort and leave it at that.
 
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Old 06-10-12, 02:48 PM
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As you said, you have easy access now, so I would use the membrane.
 
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Old 06-10-12, 10:27 PM
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I am going to do some looking around to see if i can find the membrane you are talking about. It sounds like that is as good as I am going to get.

Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 06-11-12, 02:56 AM
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There is a product I have always used on below grade waterproofing for commercial projects that is made by W.R. Grace called Bituthene 4000. It's a peel & stick membrane that comes in rolls and is applied much like an ice & water product. I have specified it on commercial buildings for many years and have never heard of any failures. I much prefer Bituthene over any of the sprayed-on or troweled-on dampproofing systems that are out there because it is very flexible and has the advantage of bridging even active cracks. I see Home Depot carries it, at least online.
 
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Old 06-11-12, 04:45 AM
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That might be it. I remember a peel & stick product.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 12:02 AM
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I was just looking at that stuff last night while trolling online looking for the stuff Pulpo was talking about. That looks like what I need on the front of the house where I have a brick front(south facing) and all the foundation is below grade. However the east facing side is vinyl over hardboard siding with about 8" of foundation above grade. I was thinking I could use rolled aluminium stock to cover the grace product to protect it from uv and mechanical damage.

What kind of detail is required to run the grace product and or aluminium to cover the concrete to sill plate gap. I already removed the bottom 2 courses of vinyl and the bottom course of hardboard and sheathing to expose the insulation and studs so I could seal the sill plate to the foundation. Later I plan on removing the vinyl and repaint the hardboard. I have already done this to some of the other vinyl siding at other places on the house and the hardboard was in very good shape minus the nail holes for the vinyl
 
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Old 06-12-12, 03:34 PM
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I looked at the details on Grace's site and they appear to be geared for commercial applications. I would suggest calling Grace, describe your situation and see what they recommend. The category you want to look under in their "Contact Me" is structural waterproofing. They should be able to help you.
 
 

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