Best way to anchor patio umbrella into concrete?


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Old 06-14-12, 09:14 AM
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Best way to anchor patio umbrella into concrete?

We have a 9 foot umbrella with four steel legs. Have been setting big pavers on/around legs to secure. I see holes in legs, no doubt to screw into wood deck.

We have a 1993 concrete deck. How best for us to ditch the pavers and secure into the concrete?

Do I need to install lead anchors into the concrete first? Are there self-tapping concrete screws? Or do I use a carbide bit and make a 2 or 3 inch deep hole and use the concrete screws?

I do not have a hammer drill.

Many thanks
 
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Old 06-14-12, 11:05 AM
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Without a hammer drill, drilling anchor holes in concrete is going to be a challenge.

How about another option? Construct a large "X" of pressure-treated 2 x 4, oriented in the flat direction and large enough for your umbrella's legs to stand on. Then anchor the legs to the wood, and call it a day. You'll want to make the junction of the 2 members flush by making dado cuts halfway through each at the intersection, and make the connection with heavy wood screws and adhesive. Brushing a good wood preservative on any untreated wood you've exposed with your sawcuts will make the thing outlast your umbrella. The beauty of going this route is no permanent holes are made in the patio, and the umbrella can still be moved if you want to shift locations. Should the framework not be heavy enough to stabilize the umbrella in windy conditions, you could either run a few beads of polyurethane adhesive between the wood bottoms and the concrete, or even just add a few chunks of heavy scrap steel to the center of the frame.
 
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Old 06-19-12, 09:35 AM
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The 9 foot square umbrella has a lot of area and a gust of wind could blow it over with a 2x4 base. It won't be moved year to year and a cover keeps it clean when winter arrives.

So, I will start asking folks at the local home improvement stores about lead anchors as opposed to self-tapping concrete screws (if there is such a creature).

Or maybe I can hire a handyman to do this, who has a hammer drill?

Any help out there?

Thank you
 
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Old 06-19-12, 10:18 AM
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Why not pour four 15"x15"x2"or3" concrete pads to set it on. Embed a bolt in the center of each pad before the concrete sets. You could get decorative with the pads perhaps embedding sea shells are marbles in to them except for where the legs will be before the concrete sets.
 
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Old 06-19-12, 10:46 AM
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I'd suggest you mark out the locations of the holes, rent a rotary hammer, and drill for lead anchors. Drill the holes a little bigger than the lead anchor, set them into the hole, thread the lags into the anchor (coat the threads with vaseline) then epoxy the lead anchors into the holes with a 2-part liquid epoxy, or the 2-part epoxy that comes in a caulking tube with a mixing nozzle. Not sure what your table legs look like, but you might be able to position the table put everything together, and then shoot the epoxy into the holes to hold everything in place. But more than likely you will have to inject a little epoxy into the hole, then set the anchor in the hole (with lag threaded into it) and tap it down. If you put enough epoxy in the hole, it will squeeze out the gaps around the edges of the anchor. Once the epoxy has completely cured, you should be able to back out the lag bolt in order to re-position the table over the anchors.

You will want to use the LONGEST lead anchors you can find, because the longer they are, the less likely they will be to pull up or get loose if the wind tries to rock the table back and forth.
 
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Old 06-19-12, 12:00 PM
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My father just use to used a star drill but I doubt anybody uses those any more.
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Old 06-19-12, 02:24 PM
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I have used a star drill. I think if I had four holes to make I would spend the money to rent a rotary hammer. I think the cost of a star drill and hammer would make most of the price to rent a drill for the hour it would take. They probably charge for a half day.
 
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Old 06-19-12, 03:11 PM
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Yadda, etc.,

Where in Oregon are you? I happen to have a very nice (and quite hefty) hammer drill, along with an assortment of masonry bits, construction adhesive and several contractor-grade extension cords. As well as having an accomplished handyman reputation, working with steel, concrete and wood for more than 50 years. I'd be willing to drill some holes for you, at no cost to you, but I have to find you first. If you're in the Portland area, or anywhere along the Willamette Valley, we (me, wife and 3 Chihuahuas) get up there several times a month. But if you're in Ontario or Lake City, it could be a while before we happen to make it there.

Think it over.

Michael
 
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Old 06-19-12, 09:24 PM
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BridgeMan45: Thank you for your very generous offer. We are near Grants Pass which seems to be 90 miles from Cottage Grove. I would not impose on you to do this. There is a handyman close by who can do this, altho I have not yet asked him. I wanted to see if I could do this on my own. It seems there are no self-tapping concrete screws, altho I have not yet asked in the local hardware stores. It takes me awhile to get my mojo working.

Thank you again for offering.
 
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Old 07-01-12, 10:26 AM
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I am very pleased to announce I dood it myself. Used my trusty Craftsman electric drill (not a hammer drill), concrete drill bits and concrete screws.

Drilled down about 2-3 inches (took me about 5 min for each hole). I did hit rebar down about an inch a few times, so I did another alternate hole a few inches away.

Used 2-1/2 inch screws with a dab of liquid nails. Two for each leg. Seems secure as I rocked the umbrella back and forth and all held well.

Thanks for your suggestions.
 
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Old 07-01-12, 10:54 AM
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Good you got it but as easy as the concrete was to drill I question its quality.
 
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Old 07-01-12, 03:07 PM
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That will be yadda yadda's project for next weekend--remove and replace the entire patio.
 
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Old 07-01-12, 03:21 PM
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Uhhhh 5 min per hole with a regular drill? You guys call that easy?

I'm really dreading fixing a gate at the gym.
 
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Old 07-01-12, 08:30 PM
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Get the wife or SO to do it. It's her gym too, yes?
 
 

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