Possibly hammering up area of slab in raised ranch basement


  #1  
Old 07-24-12, 11:53 AM
tevil's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: usa
Posts: 400
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
Possibly hammering up area of slab in raised ranch basement

Well Im turning the half bath in our lower level of the rasied ranch to a full with shower and in the process putting the washing machine drain down there with it to get it out of where it currently runs through the bathroom.

I am going to have to jack up a line wide and long enough to put a 2" wash drain, a floor drain (for safety sake) and the shower drain. This also runs fairly close to the block foundation wall.

I am going to tie everything into the toilet bend which i will swap from the old lead bend to PVC while im down there since the flange is rotted out.

Does anyone have any tips for the jacking up and then re pouring of new concrete?

The plumbing is no issue as I used to do plumb/heat but never personally jacked up a portion of slab before and have no idea how thick it is or how it will affect the surrounding area.

thanks
 
  #2  
Old 07-24-12, 01:25 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,801
Received 2,189 Upvotes on 1,959 Posts
I like to saw cut the edges as deep as possible with a diamond saw. The saw cuts make it easier to break out the concrete in between and prevents cracks from running out across the undisturbed concrete.

A wet saw gets the job done with minimal dust and you can rent them for half a day. If you have finished flooring nearby you may want a helper standing by with a wet/dry vac to suck up the water. You can also put a diamond blade in a normal (heavy duty) circular saw but it creates an incredible amount of dust and a cartridge style mask is almost required. Sawing concrete with either saw is quite noisy so get a comfortable pair of earplugs, which if using the saw dry will help keep dust out of your years.

If you get good deep saw cuts and your trenches are not too extensive a rotary hammer or sledge hammer could be good enough. If you don't saw cut or have a lot to do then renting an electric jack hammer is well worth the money.
 
  #3  
Old 07-25-12, 08:31 AM
tevil's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: usa
Posts: 400
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
i wonder how much a company would charge to just come in and cut me the channels?
the saw sounds like a much nicer idea.
thanks a ton. I was orignally going to use a jack because i wanted to take up a shotty crete walk way the old owner put in as well but i can always get back around to that in the long run.
thanks again
 
  #4  
Old 07-25-12, 08:46 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,801
Received 2,189 Upvotes on 1,959 Posts
I had a concrete installer do some cutting for me and it was $50. I told him I was flexible time wise so he could work it in on a day when he had nothing else to do so the price was just something he pulled out of the air. He made quick work of it and since his saw was bigger he was able to cut all the way through the slab which made it much easier to remove.
 
  #5  
Old 07-26-12, 08:39 AM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 2,838
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
A word of caution for anyone considering cutting (or drilling, for that matter) full-depth through a concrete slab. It's not unusual for embedded water supply lines to actually project up into the lower regions of a slab, instead of being buried in the subgrade below concrete level.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: