efflorescence problem on sandstone - advice please!


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Old 08-10-12, 04:49 AM
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efflorescence problem on sandstone - advice please!

Good morning

I have recently experienced efflorescence building on the sandstone brick work of this property. The area effected sits directly below the vent for the combi boiler. Is this due to condensation dripping down on to the stone beneath? And does the condensation dripping have excessive lime in it causing this occurring?
Finally any advice on cleaning? I guess Hydrochloride Acid is out of the question? Or can it be diluted and used on the sandstone?
Thanks for your help

 
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Old 08-10-12, 07:31 AM
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What about Muriatic Acid or are you afraid to use any acid at all?
 
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Old 08-10-12, 07:47 AM
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are you sure this is sandstone? It appears to be split-faced concrete block to me but I could be wrong. this could affect the decision on clean up. Muriatic acid is probably the correct answer but I would verify the actual material first.
 
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Old 08-10-12, 02:55 PM
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actually muratic acid will make it worse, you'll need to go to a masonry supply or concrete supply yard, they have products to remove this. i forget some of the names, but muratic acid brings out more efflorvesence.
 
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Old 08-10-12, 03:38 PM
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Effloresence is a salt deposit caused by masonry drying out and leaving crystalized salts on the surface when the water evaporates.

It may or may not be caused by condensate from the boiler, but if it is in fact a salt deposit (however caused) washing it in anything is not going to help because the salts will go into solution and be re-absorbed into the masonry.

Best way to get rid is to brush it with a small stiff brush.
 
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Old 08-11-12, 05:11 AM
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Best way to get rid is to brush it with a small stiff brush
I've always used a wire brush to remove efflorescence BUT that was always during prep for painting.
 
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Old 08-11-12, 05:49 AM
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Should have made it clear; I meant to say a bristle brush (nat. fibre or nylon) not wire as I think that could lead to staining of the masonry
 
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Old 08-11-12, 05:53 AM
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Tony, I knew that was what you meant but it's probably best that it was clarified anyway
 
 

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