part of 35 yr old concrete floor is not taking stain - what can I do?

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Old 09-02-12, 12:56 PM
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part of 35 yr old concrete floor is not taking stain - what can I do?

Hello,
I have put one coat of yellow colored stain on my concrete floor in patio. Part of the floor did not receive the stain. I just put the other, darker, stain on it a couple of hours ago, and that part of the floor looks like it did not take this second darker stain. This concrete is original to the house- I think; therefore, it's about 35 years old. The rest of the concrete floor took the stain well. Is there something I can do to the concrete in order for it receive the stain? I don't think it was sealed; otherwise, the whole floor would have been sealed.

I appreciate any solutions, if there are any.

Thanks!
 
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Old 09-03-12, 07:27 AM
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Are we talking about an outside, uncovered patio? It could have been sealed & the weather wore some of it away, in parts. I'm not a fan of painting, staining or sealing concrete. It's no longer maintenance free once that's done. My guess is that you would have to pressure wash it with a red tip.
 
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Old 09-03-12, 07:44 AM
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What type of stain are you using?
 
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Old 09-03-12, 11:46 AM
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Marksr....
I'm using Kemiko brand Stone Tone stain.
 
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Old 09-03-12, 11:52 AM
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Pulpo,
this is a covered patio area that has insulated walls and a screen door to the outside. It doesn't have air or heat to it - yet. as far as I can ascertain, this concrete has always been covered. It is about 10' by 20'. I've attached two photos - one is of an area where the stain did not take very well and one where the concrete took the stain well.

I heard about sanding the concrete with 100 or 120 grit sandpaper; would that help? According to the instructions, I used Kemiko Neutra Clean with a scrub brush to clean the surface before applying the stain.

Thanks -
Bills Sis
 
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Old 09-03-12, 02:46 PM
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I never heard of sanding concrete especially with such a fine sand paper. If you still want to stain it, call the company & ask them why their product doesn't work.
562-236-1170

Otherwise, since it's enclosed, I would install some indoor/outdoor carpet or something similar & forget about the stain.
 
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Old 09-03-12, 03:38 PM
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I haven't worked with acid stains but from what little bit I know about them - they are better suited for new concrete or at least concrete that has been protected from any types of staining. The acid stain reacts with the concrete to give the color. It might be you used the wrong type of stain for the condition of the concrete. There are solid color concrete stains that work fairly well. I don't know if there are any issues with applying them over an acid stain.

We have a few members that have experience with acid stains, hopefully one or more of them will have time to reply.
 
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Old 09-03-12, 04:40 PM
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Thanks Marksr and Pulpo, for your thoughts. I hate to put something over this concrete, as I've spent money already on the stain. Plus I got my heart set on this stain! I'll call the company tomorrow, to see what they have to say.

Oh...the joys of home ownership! Ha!!
 
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Old 09-04-12, 05:25 AM
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Something is keeping the stain out of that area...probably sealer. Sanding the floor with a floor buffer equipped with an 80 to 100 grit sanding screen may remove enough sealer so the stain can penetrate and react. If not, you could try scrubbing the spot with rags and xylol (xylene), but watch out for the fumes! They are potent.
If all else fails, you can use an acetone dye to blend in the color. It looks like acid stain but is not reactive. Downside is that it may fade over time. there is a place in Oklahoma City called The Stamp Store. They could help you out, especially the owner Doug Bannister who has applied (and sold) acid stain since the early 90's. Good luck.
By the way, what type of floor covering was on the floor before you tried staining it? That may tell the tale as to why it won't take stain.
 
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Old 09-22-12, 06:06 PM
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ive been dealing with acid stains and sealers for a few years now and i my opinion i would use a floor buffer and red or black pad, wash, scrub (sand) and restain the concrete. its all about the cleanliness of the concrete. if its that old it wount matter. it should still accept the acid stain. for starters, the surface must be well cleaned. if there are any residues on it, they should be degreased, cleaned, neutralized and then the acid stain applied. most acid stains require at least-i let them set for 24 hrs- 4 hrs minimum. then neurtalized and sealed 24 hrs after drying. personally i like the look. yes, it isnt maintenance free, but most concrete if not taken care of will eventually fall apart if you use any ice melt on them in the winter in which case you need to seal it if your smart.
 
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