filling in old flue access hole


  #1  
Old 09-20-12, 10:02 PM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
filling in old flue access hole

Im not really sure if this is the right section as my issues is interior but I couldn't find a better matching section.

I have a chimney running through my kitchen. It is framed in an had lath and plaster around it. Im doing a complete gut and remodel so I have everything down to studs right now and plan to put drywall back up.

On the chimney there is a hole with one of those covers over it. I would assume it was for an old wood stove for the kitchen or something like that. The chimney is still active as my oil fired boiler uses it. I dont need this access hole in the kitchen though and would like to patch it and then put my dry wall up.

I was not able to really find any good information on how to properly do this. I want to make sure its right so it doesn't leak inside that cavity. For fire concerns or safety as far as carbon monoxide etc. I'm sure anything will be better then the metal bowl type deal that was covering it previously. But at least I had access to that if there were ever any issues. This patch will have drywall over it and I would have to tear into it to access if there was a problem.

thanks for any advise!
 
  #2  
Old 09-21-12, 01:30 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 10 Upvotes on 9 Posts
How far out does the thimble reach? I feel it may still stick out further than your sheetrock unless you modify it, or cut it back. Could you post a pix or two of the thimble area (not close ups) so we can see what you see? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #3  
Old 10-03-12, 04:40 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Chandler,

Thanks for replying. I really appologize for not getting back to you in so long. Ive been a customer site for work for the last month working nights and my time has been quite short. I also didnt have any pictures of the area to post. Now that I am home I took a few this morning.

I just read the "not close ups" direction and these are close but not super close.... Sorry I missed that at first. But I think you can see the whole area in question. Im not sure what the "thimble" is that you are referring too. I will do some research and figure that out..

Here are a few pictures. I can take others if you need.

Sorry if a few of them are out of focus. I just saw them not on my phone for the first time .

Anyway let me know if you need something more.

I really appreciate the help!
 
Attached Images     
  #4  
Old 10-03-12, 01:55 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 10 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Your best bet would be to remove the nice dinner plate , and use mortar to close up the hole. A quick setting mortar mixed rather thick would be best. You didn't say if the boiler was using a stainless steel liner pipe going up or just the raw chimney. Pix are fine BTW, except for the close up.
 
  #5  
Old 10-04-12, 05:38 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 2,838
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
Pix are a bit blurry, but it looks like someone stuffed some paper-backed fiberglass insulation into the cavity behind the thimble hole. And the black crud at the bottom of the framing looks highly suspicious, as if the flue (assuming there is one) or chimney might be leaking oil vapors through whatever is behind the fiberglass. You should make sure any chimney/flue perforations are tightly sealed with mortar and bricks.
 
  #6  
Old 11-06-12, 05:14 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Bridge man - The insulation you see is the remnants of older blown in insulation. The exterior wall behind the chimney has some left over but the rest of the kitchen had patches of blown in from who knows when. I ripped just about all of it out. Since it was blown in it was kind of all over the place around the chimney. Its not paper backed at all. And When I first moved into the house the plate covering that hole wasnt that tight as I could hear it hit the stops everytime the furnace started up and there was some pressure in the chimney. When I did all of the demo with the plaster etc I tightened up that place with some dry wall screws for a temporary fix until I filled it in. I havent heard it budge at all and I do have a Carbon monoxide detector for safety as well.

Im going to attempt to tackle this project after work. I took a closer look at this access hole and it appears that there is a steel liner coming out of the chimney too meet what was once the surface of the plaster and then this plate or ring rather was used on the surface of the plaster wall as a retainer for a "cup" that went inside the hole to plug it up. When I remove that framing and the ring/cup I will be left over with this piece that comes out. Should I cut this back with some metal shears?

As for filling it in with mortar. Should I use some smaller bricks? I assume I cant just fill the entire hole with mortar right? I would think there isnt really anything behind it for support while it dries?

I did some more searching and found this topic on here. filling in a hole in my old chimney

It seems like this is the same issue as I have.

Thanks again for your replies I do appreciate it.
 
  #7  
Old 11-06-12, 01:21 PM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ok so I was able to take another closer look at this opening and actually take the plate and ring off.

It appears that there is some sort of ceramic thimble inside with a cutout for this opening. Of course there is no brick for the opening either. So I think i will be able to simply cut some bricks to fit in there and use mortar etc right? It actually doesnt look like it will be that bad to deal with. I tried to take a few pictures but the lighting and being so close is hard to really capture all of it.
 
Attached Images   
  #8  
Old 11-07-12, 05:28 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Well i tackeled this last night and left the furnace off for the entire evening. which left me with a luke warm shower after I was done playing with mortar

All came out quite well. I started by making things look pretty with the three bricks i used but the last one didnt have that much room to be placed so I kind of had to butter all side and shove it in there. then follow up with filling in gaps with my finger and trowel. Since this little section is inside and will be covered up I wanted to make sure there was plenty of material sealing it off.

the dinner plate or thimble deal was held in their with that ring like i mentioned. However the stove pipe type deal that the timble went inside of more of a stock pipe neck was actually nailed into the mortar on the corners. Luckily I was able to pull the nails out without any damage. The 100+ year old mortar that is in there doesnt look like it was layed in very nicely but its holding up very well. No crumbles what so ever and still solid all around. I have a feeling they dont build houses like this anymore...

Oh and finding bricks wasnt that easy... Home depot doesnt really carry "bricks" per say. I was able to find something that worked though. I also buttered the back side of the 3 bricks with mortar mixed quick thick to provide an extra layer of protection.

Thanks for all your help guys. Sorry for the constant updates and questions but I figure i would close this thread off if someone else stumbles across it.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: