bricklaying - is my bricklayer capable?

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Old 09-28-12, 11:59 AM
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bricklaying - is my bricklayer capable?

Dear All - I am seeking your advice in regards the competencies of a bricklayer who has just started a job for me. The job involves the construction of a 1.2m high brick wall for which i have a few concerns about the quality of his blockwork beneath ground. I have attached an image which shows the main concern - that he has not buttered the sides of the blockwork with mortar resulting in the bottom course not being bonded to the blockwork beside them - only bonded to the blockwork above and beneath.

My question is whether this (no doubt for the purposes of saving time and materials) is likely to affect the structural integrity of the finished wall and make it more prone to movement.

All knowledgeable responses appreciated.
 
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Old 09-28-12, 12:11 PM
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Welcome to the forums! He most likely left this area devoid of concrete to be weeping holes for water, if no provision was made to redirect water to the sides behind the wall. Without weep holes the wall would be pushed over by hydraulic pressure behind it. How much higher will the wall go? Will it be veneered with brick? These are concrete block. I've seen better joint striking if it were to be left as is. If it is to be veneered, it's fine. I am assuming he set this on a footer at least 12" wide and deep with rebar in it.
 
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Old 09-28-12, 12:15 PM
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Thanks for your response. The two courses of blockwork shown will be beneath ground with 1.1m of brickwork above topped with a stone coping - overall height 1.2m above ground. The fottings are a 600mm spread of gen 1 readymix 150mm deep but without the inclusion of rebar.
 
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Old 09-28-12, 12:18 PM
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You should be OK. Again, water has to go somewhere and undue pressure on the block will cause the entire structure to fail. You didn't mention any perf pipe or drainage behind the wall, so I am assuming this is the way the water will migrate.
 
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Old 09-28-12, 12:20 PM
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many thanks for your responses - may i clarify if weep holes are still required if the wall is not retaining, e.g. it has earth on either side of it.
 
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Old 09-28-12, 12:22 PM
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For water to migrate to the place it wants to go, yes. Water will win, and it will move to either side depending on the pressure at a given time. Without the holes it will puddle up on the pressure side.
 
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Old 09-28-12, 12:23 PM
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Earth on either side means measures need to be in place for the water to get through or around the wall.
 
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Old 09-28-12, 12:25 PM
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I'd say yes to the weeping since it will allow water to move from side to side as necessary.

Btw....my retaining wall and fence has no mortar in the vertical joints only the horizontals......I believe it's because of the type of block that nest with each other end to end.
 
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