Concrete Block Fire Pit


  #1  
Old 11-09-12, 08:08 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 152
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Concrete Block Fire Pit

Hey everyone:

I am going to build a fire pit in my side yard. No grass, weeds or anything like that, just pebbles and rock.
So my thought is to use good old cinder blocks, make about a 7' x 3.5' pit and make the first row of blocks laying on their side so air will get into the fire easy. Then a second level on top with the blocks standing up as they would in a wall. My questions are;
1. Do I need to glue the top layer down?
2. Is two rows high enough?
3. Any suggestions from anyone about this little project?
Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions and take care.
Dan in Albuquerque
 
  #2  
Old 11-09-12, 10:36 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 2,838
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
Your plan isn't a good one, for several reasons. Conventional concrete block is not particularly fire-resistant, meaning high temperatures will cause it to spall and fracture. Also, laying the first course on its side will cause the voids to soon plug up with ashes, meaning you will have a perpetual maintenance headache on your hands.

Do yourself a big favor, and buy a large steel "kettle" to serve as the firepit. So much easier, and far less effort (and talking to yourself) in the long run.
 
  #3  
Old 11-10-12, 09:12 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 152
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hey:

OK, will give it some thought.

Thanks and take care

Dan in Albuquerque
 
  #4  
Old 11-10-12, 09:57 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,460
Received 47 Upvotes on 43 Posts
Dan,
One additional thought is to be careful with the air inlets. Retaining the ability to close them in case the wind comes up is a must. Once a fire pit get established, it is very difficult to cool down and put out. I have directed a garden house at a well established bed of coals for 30 minutes and still had a robust bed of coals.

Any thoughts of digging down a bit?

Bud
 
  #5  
Old 11-17-12, 08:00 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 152
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hey Bud:
Thanks for the reply.. Yea, I did think about digging down about 6-8". There is already a layer of gravel but it is just on the top of the surface. I live in Albuquerque and it is very windy here.. didn't think about that one. I still like the open pit because I can make it a little bit bigger than say a Weber pit.
Any additional suggestions or do you think it would be better off just getting the Weber?
Wet me know when you get a chance and take care.

Dan in Albuquerque.
 
  #6  
Old 11-17-12, 09:38 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,460
Received 47 Upvotes on 43 Posts
I did a little reading and here are some thoughts.

Just a fire or some cooking. Search on outdoor campsite fire pits, there were a few pictures and several how to links.

In Maine we have many approved remote campsites with a fire ring and some sort of grill on top, not that I would toss my steak on top of one . But it is a place for pots and pans and a washable grill if desired. I couldn't find the link, but have seen an ad from a small Maine family business where they make fire rings.

An advantage of a ring or other uniform edge would be the ability to cover it when done.

I also noted several links discussing children falling into a fire pit. Something to consider, maybe some type of perimeter ring a couple of feet high.

Check local codes to be sure what you put up will be something approved for use without a fire permit every time. In my area, it would need a screen on top and proper distance from combustibles along with an inspection. Insurance co may want to see it as well. I always hate to mention that, but would hate to not mention it.

Found it: The Perfect Campfire
and here are some of their pictures: The Perfect Campfire Portfolio
I imagine they are a bit pricey, but the idea is interesting.

Bud
 
  #7  
Old 11-19-12, 06:19 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 152
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hey Bud:

Thanks for all the help. Many points that I did not consider.. such as kids, fire screen and how to put it out. I think I am going to go with the Weber... No worries, no muss and no local codes to deal with.

I do like the links you send me.... When I win the Mega game I will have one built.

Thanks again and take care.
Dan in Albuquerque
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: