Orientation of Metal Lath for Fireplace

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Old 01-08-13, 09:00 PM
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Orientation of Metal Lath for Fireplace

I'm getting ready to start building a stone veneer fireplace inside my home. I've done a lot of reading on methods but I am seeing two different recommendations on the proper way to orient the metal lath under the scratch coat. All the sources that I've read indicate that the lath should be installed horizontally. However, the "experts" recommend about 50%-50% as to whether or not the "rough" side should be up, or be down.

To me, it just seems intuitive that the rough side should be oriented up. If it should be down, I would really like to understand the reasoning for the rough side being down.

Thanks
 
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Old 01-09-13, 06:35 AM
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Lightly rub your hand on the lath in all directions. You will know which way to hang it. There is a sharp side, and you will feel it. That goes up.
 
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Old 01-09-13, 03:40 PM
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Concrete Board versus traditional scratch coat

Thanks Chandler!

Today a friend stopped by my house and recommended that I use Concrete Board instead of the traditional scratch coat system for a stone veneer Fireplace. I've never heard about this before, but it would definitely be cheaper and easier than building the scratch coat system.

Is this acceptable? Is it as simple as screwing the concrete board to the framing and attaching the stone directly to the concrete board? Any input would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 01-09-13, 04:13 PM
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Depends on the size of the stone you are going to use. I did a fireplace using cement board and attached man made ledgestone to it and it worked out great. Used type N mortar and sand.
 
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Old 01-09-13, 04:33 PM
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I am using a Dry-stacked stone veneer (Golden Harvest Rubble) by Coronado. About 2 inches thick with varying shapes.My fireplace is approx 6' wide and 11.5' feet high.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 09:27 AM
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Sounds very similar to what I used. Cement Board is a lot easier to work with.
 
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Old 01-17-13, 02:12 PM
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ement board or metal

i all ways used the metal lath 2.5 light weight, never had a problem, yes the right way to hang metal lath is cups up, and i don;t think it really hurts if you hang metal upside down, and belive me i worked with plasters and they would piss a little if it was wrong ,but still works i worked with my 2 uncles that were plasters that did a lot of pebble dashing and belive me it wasen't always put on right that is my input bighasmmer
 
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Old 01-17-13, 05:52 PM
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Yes when you rub your hand up the lath it should be harder to rub up than down. The reason it matters is because if it is the other way every time the edge of the trowel hits one of those edges in the lath it cuts the key off rather than letting it flow into and behind the lath thus forming a good solid more monolithic slab. A lot less mortar is wasted if the lath is right. That prevents the mortar from being cut off and falling behind the lath. If there is some kind of backing behind the lath then it is less critical but then the lath should be self furring.
If you use cement board put the rougher side out. You can use screws below the stone to help hold it until the mortar sets. The screw can be left in place if it is recessed enough otherwise remove them when the mortar has set. Screws only hold in the studs however. Or put on the bottom course of stone, let that set and then use shims and wedges to hold it up on subsequent courses and remove them when the mortar sets.
 
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