Concrete for tools surface behind workshop

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-14-13, 08:08 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 563
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Concrete for tools surface behind workshop

So I've got a 3' overhang or so on north side of my workshop, and the area between the workshop and the back fence is about 12' wide. I'm considering adding a 3' by 27' strip of concrete as a general-purpose base for tools or a workbench or storage of things that need that need to be off of the dirt, like lumber and the like. I also plan to set a few large eye-bolts into the concrete close to the workshop at intervals to serve as points to lock things like the hydraulic press and grinder enclosure down so that they're less likely to be stolen.

If I've done my math right, it looks like 3 foot by 27 foot by 4 inch is one cubic yard of concrete. Does this sound right? Also, any suggestions for the size of eye-bolts (or a suitable substitute) for being able to lock/chain things down? Would two control joints (making three slabs) be enough, or do I need to have more than that?

A friend has a portable trailer concrete mixer, I'm considering asking to borrow it. When we had a huge slab poured at the previous house I watched how they did it, and I think that I could manage, and my guess is that if I get the forms made up first, the buddy with the mixer would probably help with finishing.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-14-13, 08:26 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,888
Received 302 Votes on 275 Posts
1 cu yd is correct. Be sure you fill your form with sand, screed and tamp it to ensure that you have exactly 4", or you will be short/long on concrete!

As for the joints, it's usually recommended that control joints be no more than 1.5 x the width of the pad. So every 4.5 ft, at a minimum. (6 slabs)
 
  #3  
Old 01-14-13, 08:29 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 563
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay, good to know on the prep and on the joints.

Maybe I'll use those fibrous pads for half, and have the other half cut so that hardware doesn't have as many places to fall into, or else use some flexible filler...
 
  #4  
Old 01-14-13, 08:32 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,888
Received 302 Votes on 275 Posts
You can strike and edge the joints with a tool while the mortar is still wet. There should be no need for expansion joints between sections on this sort of a pad, unless you wanted to put some against the workshop wall to act as a straightedge for the back side of your pad. This will be a continuous pour, basically just like a sidewalk. You will need to work fast and mix the tail end of each load of cement as you add a new batch to the old in order to avoid a cold joint in the placement of each successive batch.

Also if you are using a ready-mix, try to measure exactly how much water you add so that each batch is the same consistency.
 
  #5  
Old 01-14-13, 09:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 563
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
*nod* I'll have some five-gallon buckets on-hand.

Sometimes it gets hot enough in the summer here that concrete sidewalks heave, but they're not usually protected by being under the eave on the north side of the building.

Assuming that rain or other moisture isn't really a problem, what's the best time of year or best temperature to pour concrete in the desert southwest? This is probably going to be a longer-term project as I have several other things around the house to do first, but seems like it would be worthwhile, and for what it's worth, I could probably let it set up and cure for well over a month before needing to put it into service...
 
  #6  
Old 01-15-13, 06:10 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,888
Received 302 Votes on 275 Posts
Anytime after all danger of frost has passed. Preferably before it gets too blistering hot. If you plan on doing it in individual pads, you might consider some wire or rebar reinforcement down the entire length of the pad to help tie them all together.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: