Bad patio pour


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Old 05-21-13, 03:39 PM
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Bad patio pour

Had a friend give me a hand doing my 40x25 patio, after being assured he knew what he was doing (I hadn't a clue). Had his 2 large sons and myself as laborers, excavated by hand, set forms, poured in 2 sittings of 6 yards each.
I'm sure you know where this is going. We were supposed to be able to use this patio in 2 weeks for my sons confirmation but my wife won't even let anyone into the backyard to see it she's so upset. We had planned on using it as just a concrete patio this year and then maybe do pavers or the like next year. I guess we have to do it sooner.
Even after using a laser device that stood away and beep at the level, it manages to have a giant puddle in the middle. Can the paving guys fix the slope so there won't be standing water?
 
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Old 05-21-13, 05:26 PM
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Two 6 yard pours... I've got to hand it to you. You've got guts. But, don't feel too bad. I've got a low spot in my driveway that was poured by professionals so it can happen. Yea, it bugs me every time I see it but in the end it really does not do much more than irritate me.

I'd use the patio for confirmation without hesitation. Even if it rains right before few will pay much attention to the puddle notice. If it does rain just have a push broom or squeegee ready to get rid of the puddle. I know we always want things to be perfect but it doesn't always work out and in the end nobody will notice.
 
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Old 05-21-13, 05:29 PM
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You sure you posted the right picture? That looks no more like a slab patio then the man in the moon.
What's all those brown stains?
Is that a wave in the slab, or it it just the picture?
 
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Old 05-21-13, 06:51 PM
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Brown spots are dirt from around the patio. It rained lightly for 2 days after pouring so when we finally let the mutts back into the yard the tracked it onto the slab. As for the wave, could be just the divide between pours. 1st pour set up way too fast, didn't really get finished, lumps, gouges and large pits at the edges. Also very dark and even dried in the sun today multicolored. 2nd pour was looser so it's more level, broomswept, consistent light grey.

What's better, trying to grind it with medium and fine teeth ( the guy in the equipment place showed me something that he said could take the top layer down to smooth it) or just have pavers or bluestone on top? If they used a thin-set could it be built up enough to fix the pitch so water wouldn't stand in the middle to freeze in winter?
 
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Old 05-21-13, 07:26 PM
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I would cut an expansion joint right through the puddle and forget about it. Unless a pad has some slope to it, you are going to have puddles here and there. Get a squeegee and enjoy your patio.
 
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Old 05-22-13, 05:34 AM
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This can be fixed and (relatively) inexpensively. It's too involved to post here so private message me and we can talk. You can probably get all your materials locally in New York.
Turn that sow's ear into a silk purse!
 
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Old 05-22-13, 05:51 AM
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I don't see joint one in that slab. That should be your first concern. Rent a gas powered concrete saw with a diamond blade and cut contraction joints (sometimes mistakenly called expansion joints). They control random cracking and should be placed either during finishing or as soon as possible when the concrete has set. On a 40 x 25 slab I personally would cut them evry 5' both directions to divide the slab into 40 equal pieces. They need to be 1/4 as deep as the slab is thick, so for a 4" thick slab the joints should be a minimum of 1 inch deep. For more decorative effect, lay the joints on a diagonal. With that many joints, some should cut through the puddles and act as small drainage channels. After you do this, then you can do some masking, apply a multi-colored concrete overlay to cover up the horrible surface, level out the low spots, and decorate the slab. When you finish with what I'm proposing, you probably won't need the pavers but you'll still have a very decorative patio. You can potentally have it done before your son's event and make the wife happy.
 

Last edited by Pecos; 05-22-13 at 06:18 AM.
 

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