Sidewalk next to house with wrong grading

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Old 06-08-13, 05:03 PM
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Sidewalk next to house with wrong grading

Hi, I'm new to this forum...well, new to DIY itself. My wife and bought a small house that's in pretty good shape, but there are a few things we have taken care of already. Here's one that I have no idea how to solve.

The back door opens to a sidewalk that is up against the side of the house:
I've added a photo to show what I can't properly explain:

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The problem appears to be that the sidewalk isn't sloped correctly, allowing puddles to form up against the concrete. We had a leak coming in from that spot, but I was able to caulk it and that has held for the last several weeks. I want to fix it correctly, but can't find a situation quite like this to even give me an idea of what it takes. If I have to hire someone, I'm ok with that. I have no problem paying pros to do those things that guys like me just shouldn't.

So i guess two questions; 1)are there any ideas of a way for me to fix this myself and, 2)if I hire someone what type of solution should I be looking for? I don't want someone coming in with some crazy suggestion and messing up the foundation.

I've attached another photo showing the length of the sidewalk, the entire thing butts up against the crawl space cinder blocks.

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Thanks - I look forward to any suggestions.

Dave
 
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Old 06-08-13, 05:59 PM
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Caulking was a good idea. Are the gutters & down spouts doing their job? Do they need any modifications or even cleaning. The idea is to keep the water away, in order to avoid having to install a dry well or redoing the sidewalk.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 06:25 PM
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Pulpo - thanks for the response. I have checked the gutters and downspouts and all are good. The problem became very evident yesterday when a tropical storm passed through the state. I watched while the heaviest rain was coming down. The gutters were ok and the water was being routed away from the house by the downspouts. However, the rain was filling up the corner, I think because it was draining into the corner. Seems the sidewalk is sloped down.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 06:45 PM
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Do the bricks to the right (second photo) slope away from the house? If so then you may be a prime candidate for a process known as slab jacking. It isn't a DIY project but it is fairly simple. A crew comes in and drills several holes through the concrete walkway alongside the house and then pump a concrete slurry through the holes lifting the entire walkway. The concrete cures and the walkway now slopes the correct direction. I can't give you any idea of the cost but the alternative is to break up the existing walkway, regrade and pour a new walkway.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 06:55 PM
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I think Furd is correct. The bricks look like they are sloped correctly. Maybe the cement settled. Jacking may work. A dry well would work but I was trying to avoid that.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 08:33 PM
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And what good is mud jacking going to do when that slab is already way to high.
How are you going to even open the door if the slab is any higher?
Good luck trying to get it open when it snows.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 09:29 PM
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You don't jack it straight up but just lift the edge next to the house. Currently it slopes from the bricks in the yard towards the house. Lift the house edge just enough to reverse the slope. Plenty of room under the door.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 11:53 PM
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I don't see "plenty of room under the door." In fact, things look quite tight to me. Mud-jacking is still an option, although it means the bottom of the exterior door will need to be trimmed to clear the raised slab. And mud-jacking can apply some significant forces against block walls, so make sure your mud guy takes a few precautions to avoid damaging the foundation.

Also, if the existing concrete was poured in direct contact with the block wall without any bond-breaker or expansion joints, mud-jacking may not be viable. It could destroy the interlocking block wall and damage the house wall.
 
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Old 06-09-13, 05:02 AM
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Bridgeman and joecaption are on the money...I just didn't have the right terms to describe it.

There is no room under the door, though my plan is to replace the door frame and replace the screen door, which could give me about an inch.

The bigger concern is whether or not the sidewalk is touching the block. I'm getting the feeling that I'll have to tear it out, start over and put in the proper drainage before pouring.

Let me know if anyone else has another idea.

Thanks a lot for your help, I at least have an idea of where to start.

Thanks again, Dave
 
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Old 06-09-13, 07:05 AM
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Rather than jacking up, why not lower the leading edge near the pavers? I would take 5 or 6 rows of pavers out, dig down a foot, and then start scraping soil from other the sidewalk. I'm thinking something relatively long and thin - a machete or maybe a metal yardstick or something. Alternative scrape and then jump on to see if you can get it to pivot and change the slope. I wouldn't do major excavating under the sidewalk or you won't be able to pack it out when you put if all back together.
 
 

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