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snowmelt from part of car runs to 4' section of wall on conrete floor of garage.

snowmelt from part of car runs to 4' section of wall on conrete floor of garage.

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Old 07-24-13, 06:39 PM
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snowmelt from part of car runs to 4' section of wall on conrete floor of garage.

Hi, I have a concrete slab home, built in 50's with an tiny attached 1-car garage. Near the front of the garage at NW corner is where my door to laundry room and rest of house is located. Within a couple feet of the laundry doorway are my waterpipes which go into the slab.
Snowmelt from the front psgr side of my suv lands on floor and travels to the wall where the water pipes are located. I currently lay down 6mil plastic with edges wrapped in wood to 'hold' the snowmelt. I've been doing this for years and occasionally leaks occur. Water has made it to the edge of the laundry room door. The year after I added new drywall to laundryroom, I got water damage again. Years ago I replaced about 4' of damaged drywall in the garage but this has also gotten damaged.
I've had estimates from 2 companies who place objects(can't remember name) below the slab to raise the floor. One company reported it wouldnt work and the other guy wanted to sell me $6000 in work but was a yahoo. My thought to grind down concrete near center of floor to move water away from the wall was logically shot down (d/t slope, may cause water to flow to other wall, etc)by one who recommended adding a leveler to the floor. I have serious concerns that this option would eventually lead to the levelling product peeling, etc over time. I may or may not have a vapor barrier below the att garage. I learned there is one below the actual 1950's house after I had radon mitigation installed. Concrete in garage does, of course, get condensation, but I'm concerned I also get moisture coming up through the concrete. I believe my water pipes, subsurface, are in tact. Water consumption has been stable throughout the years. Mudjacking has been recommended but I'm concerned this could cause damage to water pipes subsurface which would be a big expense. It has also been recommended to have old floor removed and new floor poured including new gravel, etc underlayment. The walls of the garage are finished. I can't see how the house and the garage are connected at the slab or if they share the same vertical part of the slab on their shared walls.. if this makes sense. House and garage built at same time. One guy suggested cutting a trench in concrete and running a drain down the length of the garage and on to the driveway. That sounded scary and I could see lots of maintenance.
I imagine this problem happens in many garages. Anyone have any decent solutions? I'd like it to be a permanant solution or a solution that a future owner of the home would find acceptable and be able to pass a house inspection. Water pipe location is a consideration for any good solution. BTW, there is no drain in the garage. I do have a 1 crack that has formed slowly over the years at garage floor center below the big door and running 2/3 - 3/4 way to front of garage. It is a skinny crach and hairline near front of garage. (Im going to have exterior work done to ensure all water diverted away from garage.). Thanks!
 
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Old 07-25-13, 02:29 AM
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maybe the trench is not a bad idea if it was a few inches wide and you could lay a piece of flat stock steel with holes or grating to make it not be a trip hazard and it would be easy to lift up and sweep out in the spring . I don`t know anything about leveling products to recommend any.
 
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Old 07-25-13, 02:47 AM
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Properly etched and cleaned floor will accept a good quality SLC and it will not peel up. Leveling the floor may help with the accumulation in that corner. As for general water run off from the vehicle, if it is a lot, you may want to consider installing a floor drain in the concrete and taking the run off to the outside.
 
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Old 07-25-13, 04:58 AM
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I had a similiar issue at my previous house, with the water from the melted snow running off into the one corner and freezing the snowblower to the floor (uninsulated/heated garage).
My issue was poor slope design in the floor (should have sloped to the center of the bay door).

A floor drain would work, but is not legal/to code in some areas (this is the case here in Ontario Canada). Something about automotive fluids running into the ground. Suspect it's more with people dumping stuff down them.
Oddly enough, trenches are acceptable.

For my case, I was looking at both options of leveling the floor so that the slope was away from the corner and adding a trench. The trench doesn't have to be big or deep, just enough to route the water where you want it.
Be sure to have some sort of pest control where the water will exit your garage. Nothing worse then mice using this as a way into a warm garage.
 
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Old 07-26-13, 08:54 AM
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Not sure a narrow trench in the concrete is the way to go, as you need a place to move the water to. Meaning you'd have to trench all the way to the vehicle door if you want to carry it out onto the driveway. I did a concrete trench job at a previous home in CO (where the klutz previous owner sloped all of the patio concrete in the wrong direction, dumping runoff right at the entry door), and it worked very well at eliminating the huge puddle that was there after every rain or snowmelt event.

If you can verify that the gravel base below the garage floor is reasonably dry, there's the option of just drilling a large diameter hole or two in the corner where water accumulates. If it were mine, removal and replacement would be the game plan. Done properly, there wouldn't be any questions about "what did they do here?" when it comes time to sell the place. If you go that route, make sure to isolate the water pipes with deep sawcuts (or a perimeter pattern of closely-spaced holes) to avoid any damage to the pipes during removals.
 
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Old 07-28-13, 04:25 PM
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Yes, a good friend of mine recommended a couple lrg-dia holes as you said. My concern was if I had a vapor barrier under house this might continue under the garage. I have concerns that perforating that vapor barrier may negate the effects of the radon mitigation system. Also, I couldn't guarantee that water wouldn't sit below the concrete and cause problems. That would likely also be next to the below-ground portion of water pipes. Such an inexpensive solution but too many variables. I've debated the whole tear out the floor thing. I won't DIY that... otherwise some person would come out to the house to fix my error and would call me certain names... I would, however, have to arm myself with enough knowledge to know that individual knew what he/she was doing. I thought I'd heard that if the house and garage share the same foundation or footings that the tear-out would not be recommended in the garage..... (?) I'd like a permanant solution as water accidents do happy when one employs temporary ones. When I fix things myself I only want to fix them once and in this case I will be doing more drywall work. If I don't get something solidified before winter, though, I may buy one of those snake-things that look like super-sized draft dodgers. They are made to sit around machinery and keep fluid from leaking elsewhere by soaking up the fluid. Perhaps it would be better than buying 6mil plastic every year, wrapping edges in wood and walking on wet plastic or the wood to access my car. (: Not complaining... some folks don't have any garage let a long a home of their own.
 
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Old 07-28-13, 04:45 PM
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I strongly suspect any home or garage built in the '50s will not have vapor barrier under the slab. Many of them didn't even have insulation in the walls.
 
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Old 07-29-13, 12:42 AM
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Another thing to think about is that over time those old copper pipes might deteriorate and your radiant floor in that area would then no longer work. There have been cases though of homes older than yours still having radiant heat work so it is a tough decision. If you do have the floor redone it will cost more but would also allow you to install new radiant heat tubing in the form of pex which from watching various home improvement shows I understand is now the preferred method of putting radiant heat in. The pex part you could even do yourself up to a point and then have the plumbing and heating person take over.
 
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Old 07-30-13, 08:50 AM
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No radiant heat. I have ductwork running through attic. I do have cool air returns (term?) running in/below the slab, though. Should not affect the garage as there is no return in there or located nearby. I think occ funky odor in house comes from those returns.
Yes, I know having a vapor barrier is an oddity for 50's homes. However, I do have an access panel I created for my bathroom plumbing. This is the only area where 'subslab' is accessible. There is a barrier down and the radon mitigator discovered it, showed me, and expressed surprise at its existence. Aside from this, I don't know anymore details. BTW, the mitigation plumetted the radon levels in my home.
 
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