Stucco over painted brick

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-07-13, 05:43 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Stucco over painted brick

Hi Folks,

I want to stucco an old brick (interior) fireplace. The brick's been painted a number of times so I'd prefer to not try and get the paint off. My thinking is that I could use paper-backed lath? Does that seem like a reasonable approach? Any thoughts on weight and style?

Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-08-13, 07:57 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Go for it (if you like to gamble, that is)! And when the paper's adhesive pulls away from or with the top layer of paint, be prepared for a ton of work in ripping it all off and starting over. If you don't believe me, contact the lath manufacturers and listen to what they tell you.

I'm not much of a gambler, so I'd take the coward's way out and use conventional lath, attached using washer-headed nails with spacers. Even if it required drilling holes in mortar/bricks for small anchors for the nails.

Do it once, and do it right.
 
  #3  
Old 10-10-13, 05:56 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Oh no, that's not what I had in mind. I probably didn't explain it very well, of course my intent is to be a "coward"! Tapcons with washers or similar. I guess it was really about the paper backed lath where the paper is a moisture barrier not for adhesion versus using plain lath. I don't know if it's a good, bad or indifferent idea to use it for this type of application. Probably just over thinking this too much, probably no good reason to use the paper backed stuff, maybe some reasons not to.
 
  #4  
Old 10-10-13, 07:57 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I could have sworn your initial post referred to self-adhesive paper backing on the lath. Was I dreaming, or did you "editorialize" the post to delete the adhesive reference?
 
  #5  
Old 10-11-13, 07:54 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Haha! Nope. But no worries, I've gone slightly crazy myself....

It's actually interesting though, now you've got me wondering if using some type of adhesive paper backed lath might not be the best way to go. I wasn't really even aware of that type of lath. While attaching it properly of course, same plan as before, but might actually be get the best overall bond that way? Or maybe I should just stick with a standard lath.

I guess I want to go with the lightest weight, most easily worked lath that still has enough strength for the application. I've only done one exterior wall in the past and I found it difficult to get the lath all lined up on the edges, overlapped properly, etc. And now I'm going to be doing this in our living room and going for a smooth/Santa Barbara type stucco finish. With plenty of corners, edges meeting walls, etc. I think I've seen plastic corner beads, etc. for use with stucco, might be easier to work with, but again, I don't know.

Pretty tricky for me, the biggest thing I have going for me is time... I can take it slooooow.
 
  #6  
Old 10-11-13, 09:34 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 1,805
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Use 3.4 expanded metal lath. It is a bit harder to work with than 2.5 expanded lath but will support the material better. Maybe you should use self furred lath but if the mortar joints in the brick are pretty deep you will still get some stucco pushed through the lath and get good bond. You might be able to use lightweight gypsum plaster and use the lighter lath. You might find StructoLite or Gypsolite easier to work with but remember it cannot be retempered once it starts to set. On the other hand it is notoriously slow setting and often actually needs a bit of accelerator to initiate the set.
 
  #7  
Old 10-15-13, 10:02 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's interesting tightcoat, StructoLite. So are you saying that I might want to consider plaster instead of stucco? Also, what you reminded me of when you mentioned self furred lath is that this is actually a "Roman" brick fireplace, very much a 50's thing. Thin brick with the mortar tucked really deep, really deep grooves.

So you've really got me thinking about other approaches now, especially because I'm still thinking about shaping the chimney a bit. So when you mention using something that might be easier to work with it sounds interesting. But would I go all "plaster"? I've heard of folks using StructoLite as a topcoat although I guess it's primarily a base coat? Of course I've only "heard" that since I started Googling StructoLite after reading your post.

Hmmm, so I guess the existing mortar depth may not really help too much if I do try to shape the chimney - build it out a bit lower down so that I add a bit of back slope to it as it rises to the ceiling. So I need to figure out how to "build out" starting at a to be added mantle and then start sloping back, then maybe backer board.

Thanks again folks for all the help!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: