Leveling/refinishing for concrete slab floor - advice please!

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Old 10-08-13, 12:27 PM
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Leveling/refinishing for concrete slab floor - advice please!

This is actually interior but thought you guys would know the best!

We are remodeling our new home that is built on a concrete slab (no basement). Since we are still in the midst of renovations, but are needing to move into the space, we are leaving the concrete bare with area rugs/carpet tiles for now. There are several uneven areas (probably 1 inch off level) where it looks like they tore up strips of floor in the past (most likely for plumbing or the now defuncted radiant heat) and patched with new concrete. Also just an overall discoloration from old adhesive.

After getting several $6,000 plus plus bids to resurface the area we are tackling the job ourselves (with some experienced family help). Looking at doing some grinding to remove old adhesive and high points, and then Quikrite Concrete Resurfacer to level and put a new layer on the whole floor. Finishing with a water based sealer.

Input or concerns based upon your experience with slabs or basement floor refinishing? Reviews on the Quikrite product are very mixed on HD and Lowes websites. A different product we should use instead?

Thanks!
 
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Old 10-08-13, 01:16 PM
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Welcome to the forums! What type flooring will be installed? If you are planning on an engineered wood floor, or tile, you may want to consider Self Leveling Compound for smaller areas. It could be that you have localized dips and wouldn't need to cover the entire floor, saving a little money, there. The SLC will seek it's own levelness although you can help it along, and will give a smooth surface afterwards.
 
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Old 10-08-13, 01:27 PM
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It sounds to me like he wants to use the Quikrete product as the finished wearing surface, with nothing over it. I wouldn't do it (for a number of reasons), but different people have different tastes.
 
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Old 10-08-13, 06:40 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I don't know what type of flooring yet. Probably some type of glue down wood product. Since we have lots of construction left didn't want to sink the money into a permanent floor yet. Maybe we would keep some of the floor bare concrete and perhaps have it professionally etched, stained, etc. But not sure yet. Just wanted something that was decent for the family (and could be vacuumed and mopped) in the meantime.

BridgeMan54, Are you saying not to do it because of the look and feel of it? Or is there something about how it will wear and be durable I should be concerned about?

One of the bedrooms has an old repaired area that needs to be leveled so thought we would start in there and see how it went to do the whole floor. We may end up just leveling out the low spots depending on how it goes...

Any recommendations on a different self leveler or sealer?

Thanks!
 
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Old 10-08-13, 07:38 PM
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I've only used the Quikrete Concrete Resurfacer on two occasions. Both locations were relatively small areas (10+/- S.F. each) that were immediately covered with vinyl flooring, so I can't say from personal experience how it would perform as a wearing surface, or even how it would take to the grinding and polishing usually performed on finished concrete floor wearing surfaces. However, I do know a major drawback would be that any moving cracks in the existing concrete floor will reflect through the Quikrete coating, as it's extremely thin. As I recall, the installation instructions included firm warnings about reflective cracks, so be prepared to deal with them. I also remember they wanted each lift to be just 1/8" thick, which I didn't comply with, as I felt that the more application layers that are incorporated into the finished product, the more chances for debonding between layers.

Equally important to me would be the difficulty in trying to uniformly finish an entire room of the stuff to a true grade, when mixing and placing it in small, 40-lb. batches. Might not be a problem if a lot of grinding is expected to be done anyway, but the rougher and bumpier the surface, the more work (and cost) to making it right. Using false forms and pulling them as the placement progresses is an option, but in thin applications I suspect there could be a tendency for variations in color where fresh material was placed in the voids left by the pulled forms--something you may or may not care about.

And no, I haven't used any other brands of floor leveler. I have been using Quikrete products for many years, and they have consistently performed better than their competitors.
 
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